Start Blocking Robocalls with RoboKiller

Privacy Policy

(800) 374-9700

Alternately: +18003749700

Reported Name:

Citibank Credit Card

User Reputation

Positive

RoboKiller Block Status

Allowed

Last Call

27 minutes ago

Total Calls

71,713

Based On

1,020 user reports

Listen

Transcription

your coinbase customer we found some suspicious activity on your coinbase account a withdrawal of 2500 dollars has been attempted from a new device if you did not authorize this transaction please press 1 to connect with coinbase fraud specialist for dispute please press 1 if you did not authorize this transaction on your coinbase

The information on this site is based on available user feedback.

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129 user reports for (800) 374-9700

The comments below are user submitted reports by third parties and are not endorsed by RoboKiller.

2 hours ago

Scam

Fake credit card or account fraud notification scam by madarchod criminals phoning from India and spoofing the actual Citibank phone number on Caller ID. This number does belong to Citibank, but it is being spoofed as a fake number on Caller ID for a fake credit card or account security and fraud alert scam by criminals calling from India to steal your credit card and Social Security numbers, bank account user login and password, and other personal and financial information. The scam may begin with a pre-recorded robotic message speaking English that is generated using text-to-speech translation software to disguise the origin of this India scam, but then you talk to the India scammer. The recording tells you that their fraud services department detected suspicious activity on your credit card or your bank account. This scam bait message is designed to scare you and the India scammer then asks for your credit card number, PIN codes, online login passwords, answers to security questions, Social Security number, and other personal information "for verification purposes". Whenever you receive a fraud alert call from a bank, credit card issuer, Amazon, Apple, UPS/FedEx/DHL, or any business, ALWAYS verify the number that they ask you to call back on, or just phone the number that is printed on the back of your credit card or the number listed on the company website. About 65% of North America scam calls come from India and 30% come from the Philippines. India scammers run hundreds of fraud, extortion, and money laundering scams every day such as posing as a fake pharmacy, fake Social Security officer saying your benefits are suspended, IRS officer collecting on fake unpaid back taxes, debt collector threatening you for fake unpaid bills, fake bank/financial/FedEx/UPS/DHL scams, pretending to offer fake health insurance, car warranty, student loan forgiveness, credit card and debt consolidation services, posing as Amazon to falsely say an unauthorized purchase was made to your credit card or your Prime membership was auto-debited from your bank, posing as Microsoft/Dell/HP/Apple to say your account has been hacked or they detected a virus on your computer, fake "we are refunding your money" or "your account has been auto-debited" scams, fake Google/Alexa listing and work-from-home scams, posing as electric utilities, Verizon, AT&T, or Comcast, fake solar panel and home purchase offers, fake fundraisers asking for donations, fake phone surveys, and the scammers try to steal your credit card, bank account/routing number, Social Security number, and personal information. India scammers often rotate through fake Social Security, subscription auto-renewal, pharmacy, and pre-approved loan scams on the same day. Philippines scammers focus more on auto/home/health/life insurance, Social Security and Medicare identity theft. Scammers use disposable VoIP phone numbers (e.g. MagicJack devices) or they spoof fake names and numbers on Caller ID. Anyone can use telecom software to phone with a fake CID name and number. Scammers spoof thousands of fake 8xx toll-free numbers. CID is useless with scam calls unless the scam asks you to phone them back. CID area codes are never the origin of scam calls since scams use spoofed CID numbers from across the US and Canada, numbers belonging to unsuspecting people, invalid area codes, and fake foreign country CID numbers; e.g. fake women crying "help me" emergency scams often spoof Mexico and Middle East CID numbers. Scammers often spoof the actual phone numbers of businesses such as Apple, Verizon, and banks to trick you into thinking the call is valid. How can you avoid being scammed by phone calls? NEVER trust any unsolicited caller who: sells something (most unsolicited calls are scams so your odds of saving money are very poor); asks for your Social Security number; offers a free gift or reward; threatens you with arrest/lawsuit or says you need to reply back soon (pressure tactic); asks you to access a website, download a file, wire transfer money or buy prepaid debit/gift cards; claims suspicious activity on your account; says your subscription is being refunded or auto-renewed/auto-debited; and all pre-recorded messages. Recordings are far more likely to be malicious scams and not just telemarketer spam. All unsolicited callers with foreign accents, usually Indian or Filipino, are usually scams. Filipino scammers tend to speak better English than Indian scammers. Filipinos speak English with a subtle accent having a slight trill. Scams often say that you inquired about a job, insurance, social security benefits, or that you previously contacted them or visited their website. A common India scam plays a fake Amazon recording. Amazon account updates are emailed, not robo-dialed. Many banks use automated fraud alert calls to confirm a suspicious purchase, but verify the number that the recording tells you to phone or just call the number printed on your credit card. India scammers impersonate AT&T DirecTV, Comcast, or a cable/Internet company, offering fake discounts or service upgrades. Indians impersonate the IRS and Social Security Administration. The IRS/SSA never make unsolicited calls and never threaten to arrest you; they initiate contact via postal mail. Real lawsuits are not phoned in, especially not using pre-recorded threats lacking details; legal notices are mailed/couriered. The police, FBI, DEA never phone to threaten arrest; they show up in person with a warrant. Scammers try to gain your trust by saying your name when they call, but their autodialer automatically displays your name or says your name in a recording when your number is dialed using phone databases that list millions of names and addresses. Scammers often call using an initial recording speaking English, Spanish, or Chinese that is easily generated using text-to-speech translation software to disguise the origin of their India phone room. Some speech synthesis software sound robotic, but others sound natural. To hide their foreign accents, some India scammers use non-Indians in their phone room. Scammers often use interactive voice response (IVR) robotic software that combines voice recognition with artificial intelligence, speaks English with American voices, and responds based on your replies. IVR calls begin with: "Hi, this is fake_name, I am a fake_job_title on a recorded line, can you hear me okay?"; or "Hi, this is fake_name, how are you doing today?"; or "Hello? (pause) Are you there?"; or "Hi, may I speak to your_name?" IVR quickly asks you a short question to elicit a yes/no reply so it hangs up if it encounters voicemail. IVR robots understand basic replies and yes/no answers. To test for IVR, ask "How is the weather over there?" since IVR cannot answer complex questions and it keeps talking if you interrupt it in mid-sentence. IVR usually transfers you to the scammer, but some scams entirely use IVR with the robot asking for your credit card or SSN. A common myth is IVR calls record you saying "yes" so scammers can authorize purchases just using your "yes" voice, but scammers need more than just a recorded "yes" from you - credit cards and SSN. Phone/email scams share two common traits: the CID name/number and the "From:" header on emails are easily faked, and the intent of scam calls is malicious just as file attachments and website links on scam emails are harmful. Scams snowball for many victims. If your personal/financial data are stolen, either by being scammed, visiting a malicious website, or by a previous data breach of a business server that stores your data, then your data gets sold by scammers on the dark web who will see you as fresh meat and prey on you even more. This is why some receive 40+ scam calls everyday while others get 0 to 2 calls per day. If you provide your personal information to a phone scammer, lured by fake 80%-discounted drugs or scared by fake IRS officers, you receive even more phone scams and identity theft can take years to repair. Most unsolicited calls are scams, often with an Indian accent. No other country is infested with pandemics of phone room sweatshops filled with criminals who belong to the lowest India caste and many are thieves and rapists who were serving jail time but released early due to prison overcrowding. Scammers often shout profanities at you. Just laugh at their abusive language. Google "Hindi swear words" and memorize some favorites, e.g. call him "Rundi Ka Bacha" (son of whore) or call her "Rundi Ki Bachi" (daughter of whore). Scammers ignore the National Do-Not-Call Registry; asking scammers to stop calling is useless. You do these scammers a favor by quickly hanging up. But you ruin their scams when you slowly drag them along on the phone call, give them fake personal and credit card data (16 random digits starting with 4 for Visa, 5 for MasterCard), ask them to speak louder and repeat what they said to waste their time and energy.

2 hours ago

block
Scam
Caller Name: Claiming unauthorized withdrawal

”Account, how withdrawal of $2,500 has been attempted from a new device. If you did not authorize this transaction, please press one to connect with coinbase, fraud specialist for dispute, please press one. If you did not authorize this transaction on your coinbase account.”

3 hours ago

none
Scam
Caller Name: Crooks

This is a scam claiming to be Citibank they are thieves trying to get information

7 hours ago

block
Scam

Fake Citibank "fraud alert"

8 hours ago

block
Credit Card
Caller Name: Fraud

800-374-9700 texted trying to get my info

January 16, 2022

none
Bank
Caller Name: Withdrawal

I no longer have a credit card with Citibank which the scammer cited as having received a request for a $1500 withdrawal. Thanks for catching it.

ANNOYED

January 16, 2022

Bank
Caller Name: Citibank

I've received about a dozen calls from this number...with the same phishing VM: "Dollars if you did not authorize this transaction please press one to connect with Citi Card Fraud Specialist for dispute please press one for the fraud dispute..."

January 15, 2022

none
Bank

Fraud Call

January 14, 2022

block
Scam

Claims to be Citibank

January 14, 2022

Scam

Fake credit card or account fraud notification scam by madarchod criminals phoning from India and spoofing the actual Citibank phone number on Caller ID. This number does belong to Citibank, but it is being spoofed as a fake number on Caller ID for a fake credit card or account security and fraud alert scam by criminals calling from India to steal your credit card and Social Security numbers, bank account user login and password, and other personal and financial information. The scam may begin with a pre-recorded robotic message speaking English that is generated using text-to-speech translation software to disguise the origin of this India scam, but then you talk to the India scammer. The recording tells you that their fraud services department detected suspicious activity on your credit card or your bank account. This scam bait message is designed to scare you and the India scammer then asks for your credit card number, PIN codes, online login passwords, answers to security questions, Social Security number, and other personal information "for verification purposes". Whenever you receive a fraud alert call from a bank, credit card issuer, Amazon, Apple, UPS/FedEx/DHL, or any business, ALWAYS verify the number that they ask you to call back on, or just phone the number that is printed on the back of your credit card or the number listed on the company website. About 65% of North America scam calls come from India and 30% come from the Philippines. India scammers run hundreds of fraud, extortion, and money laundering scams every day such as posing as a fake pharmacy, fake Social Security officer saying your benefits are suspended, IRS officer collecting on fake unpaid back taxes, debt collector threatening you for fake unpaid bills, fake bank/financial/FedEx/UPS/DHL scams, pretending to offer fake health insurance, car warranty, student loan forgiveness, credit card and debt consolidation services, posing as Amazon to falsely say an unauthorized purchase was made to your credit card or your Prime membership was auto-debited from your bank, posing as Microsoft/Dell/HP/Apple to say your account has been hacked or they detected a virus on your computer, fake "we are refunding your money" or "your account has been auto-debited" scams, fake Google/Alexa listing and work-from-home scams, posing as electric utilities, Verizon, AT&T, or Comcast, fake solar panel and home purchase offers, fake fundraisers asking for donations, fake phone surveys, and the scammers try to steal your credit card, bank account/routing number, Social Security number, and personal information. India scammers often rotate through fake Social Security, subscription auto-renewal, pharmacy, and pre-approved loan scams on the same day. Philippines scammers focus more on auto/home/health/life insurance, Social Security and Medicare identity theft. Scammers use disposable VoIP phone numbers (e.g. MagicJack devices) or they spoof fake names and numbers on Caller ID. Anyone can use telecom software to phone with a fake CID name and number. Scammers spoof thousands of fake 8xx toll-free numbers. CID is useless with scam calls unless the scam asks you to phone them back. CID area codes are never the origin of scam calls since scams use spoofed CID numbers from across the US and Canada, numbers belonging to unsuspecting people, invalid area codes, and fake foreign country CID numbers; e.g. fake women crying "help me" emergency scams often spoof Mexico and Middle East CID numbers. Scammers often spoof the actual phone numbers of businesses such as Apple, Verizon, and banks to trick you into thinking the call is valid. How can you avoid being scammed by phone calls? NEVER trust any unsolicited caller who: sells something (most unsolicited calls are scams so your odds of saving money are very poor); asks for your Social Security number; offers a free gift or reward; threatens you with arrest/lawsuit or says you need to reply back soon (pressure tactic); asks you to access a website, download a file, wire transfer money or buy prepaid debit/gift cards; claims suspicious activity on your account; says your subscription is being refunded or auto-renewed/auto-debited; and all pre-recorded messages. Recordings are far more likely to be malicious scams and not just telemarketer spam. All unsolicited callers with foreign accents, usually Indian or Filipino, are usually scams. Filipino scammers tend to speak better English than Indian scammers. Filipinos speak English with a subtle accent having a slight trill. Scams often say that you inquired about a job, insurance, social security benefits, or that you previously contacted them or visited their website. A common India scam plays a fake Amazon recording. Amazon account updates are emailed, not robo-dialed. Many banks use automated fraud alert calls to confirm a suspicious purchase, but verify the number that the recording tells you to phone or just call the number printed on your credit card. India scammers impersonate AT&T DirecTV, Comcast, or a cable/Internet company, offering fake discounts or service upgrades. Indians impersonate the IRS and Social Security Administration. The IRS/SSA never make unsolicited calls and never threaten to arrest you; they initiate contact via postal mail. Real lawsuits are not phoned in, especially not using pre-recorded threats lacking details; legal notices are mailed/couriered. The police, FBI, DEA never phone to threaten arrest; they show up in person with a warrant. Scammers try to gain your trust by saying your name when they call, but their autodialer automatically displays your name or says your name in a recording when your number is dialed using phone databases that list millions of names and addresses. Scammers often call using an initial recording speaking English, Spanish, or Chinese that is easily generated using text-to-speech translation software to disguise the origin of their India phone room. Some speech synthesis software sound robotic, but others sound natural. To hide their foreign accents, some India scammers use non-Indians in their phone room. Scammers often use interactive voice response (IVR) robotic software that combines voice recognition with artificial intelligence, speaks English with American voices, and responds based on your replies. IVR calls begin with: "Hi, this is fake_name, I am a fake_job_title on a recorded line, can you hear me okay?"; or "Hi, this is fake_name, how are you doing today?"; or "Hello? (pause) Are you there?"; or "Hi, may I speak to your_name?" IVR quickly asks you a short question to elicit a yes/no reply so it hangs up if it encounters voicemail. IVR robots understand basic replies and yes/no answers. To test for IVR, ask "How is the weather over there?" since IVR cannot answer complex questions and it keeps talking if you interrupt it in mid-sentence. IVR usually transfers you to the scammer, but some scams entirely use IVR with the robot asking for your credit card or SSN. A common myth is IVR calls record you saying "yes" so scammers can authorize purchases just using your "yes" voice, but scammers need more than just a recorded "yes" from you - credit cards and SSN. Phone/email scams share two common traits: the CID name/number and the "From:" header on emails are easily faked, and the intent of scam calls is malicious just as file attachments and website links on scam emails are harmful. Scams snowball for many victims. If your personal/financial data are stolen, either by being scammed, visiting a malicious website, or by a previous data breach of a business server that stores your data, then your data gets sold by scammers on the dark web who will see you as fresh meat and prey on you even more. This is why some receive 40+ scam calls everyday while others get 0 to 2 calls per day. If you provide your personal information to a phone scammer, lured by fake 80%-discounted drugs or scared by fake IRS officers, you receive even more phone scams and identity theft can take years to repair. Most unsolicited calls are scams, often with an Indian accent. No other country is infested with pandemics of phone room sweatshops filled with criminals who belong to the lowest India caste and many are thieves and rapists who were serving jail time but released early due to prison overcrowding. Scammers often shout profanities at you. Just laugh at their abusive language. Google "Hindi swear words" and memorize some favorites, e.g. call him "Rundi Ka Bacha" (son of whore) or call her "Rundi Ki Bachi" (daughter of whore). Scammers ignore the National Do-Not-Call Registry; asking scammers to stop calling is useless. You do these scammers a favor by quickly hanging up. But you ruin their scams when you slowly drag them along on the phone call, give them fake personal and credit card data (16 random digits starting with 4 for Visa, 5 for MasterCard), ask them to speak louder and repeat what they said to waste their time and energy.

January 14, 2022

none
Scam
Caller Name: bitcoin

bitcoin

January 14, 2022

Scam
Caller Name: CITIBank

Calling saying I have fraudulent activity on account of $1490.00. I do not have a debit/bank account with CitiBank so this must be a phishing scam that they are using the Citi phone number to call on somehow.

January 13, 2022

Scam
Caller Name: Scammers pretending to be Citibank

Scammers claiming to be Citibank claiming $1498.00 was charged to credit card. I don't use Citibank so this is definitely a scam.

January 13, 2022

block
Caller Name: Suspicious

Suspicious

January 13, 2022

none
Scam
Caller Name: Citibank charge

This number is a scam. Checking with Citibank they advised of a lot inquiries coming in with the same amount of 1,492.00. Do not press option “1” on the call!!

January 12, 2022

Foreign Language

Fake credit card or account fraud notification scam by madarchod criminals phoning from India and spoofing the actual Citibank phone number on Caller ID. This number does belong to Citibank, but it is being spoofed as a fake number on Caller ID for a fake credit card or account security and fraud alert scam by criminals calling from India to steal your credit card and Social Security numbers, bank account user login and password, and other personal and financial information. The scam may begin with a pre-recorded robotic message speaking English that is generated using text-to-speech translation software to disguise the origin of this India scam, but then you talk to the India scammer. The recording tells you that their fraud services department detected suspicious activity on your credit card or your bank account. This scam bait message is designed to scare you and the India scammer then asks for your credit card number, PIN codes, online login passwords, answers to security questions, Social Security number, and other personal information "for verification purposes". Whenever you receive a fraud alert call from a bank, credit card issuer, Amazon, Apple, UPS/FedEx/DHL, or any business, ALWAYS verify the number that they ask you to call back on, or just phone the number that is printed on the back of your credit card or the number listed on the company website. About 65% of North America scam calls come from India and 30% come from the Philippines. India scammers run hundreds of fraud, extortion, and money laundering scams every day such as posing as a fake pharmacy, fake Social Security officer saying your benefits are suspended, IRS officer collecting on fake unpaid back taxes, debt collector threatening you for fake unpaid bills, fake bank/financial/FedEx/UPS/DHL scams, pretending to offer fake health insurance, car warranty, student loan forgiveness, credit card and debt consolidation services, posing as Amazon to falsely say an unauthorized purchase was made to your credit card or your Prime membership was auto-debited from your bank, posing as Microsoft/Dell/HP/Apple to say your account has been hacked or they detected a virus on your computer, fake "we are refunding your money" or "your account has been auto-debited" scams, fake Google/Alexa listing and work-from-home scams, posing as electric utilities, Verizon, AT&T, or Comcast, fake solar panel and home purchase offers, fake fundraisers asking for donations, fake phone surveys, and the scammers try to steal your credit card, bank account/routing number, Social Security number, and personal information. India scammers often rotate through fake Social Security, subscription auto-renewal, pharmacy, and pre-approved loan scams on the same day. Philippines scammers focus more on auto/home/health/life insurance, Social Security and Medicare identity theft. Scammers use disposable VoIP phone numbers (e.g. MagicJack devices) or they spoof fake names and numbers on Caller ID. Anyone can use telecom software to phone with a fake CID name and number. Scammers spoof thousands of fake 8xx toll-free numbers. CID is useless with scam calls unless the scam asks you to phone them back. CID area codes are never the origin of scam calls since scams use spoofed CID numbers from across the US and Canada, numbers belonging to unsuspecting people, invalid area codes, and fake foreign country CID numbers; e.g. fake women crying "help me" emergency scams often spoof Mexico and Middle East CID numbers. Scammers often spoof the actual phone numbers of businesses such as Apple, Verizon, and banks to trick you into thinking the call is valid. How can you avoid being scammed by phone calls? NEVER trust any unsolicited caller who: sells something (most unsolicited calls are scams so your odds of saving money are very poor); asks for your Social Security number; offers a free gift or reward; threatens you with arrest/lawsuit or says you need to reply back soon (pressure tactic); asks you to access a website, download a file, wire transfer money or buy prepaid debit/gift cards; claims suspicious activity on your account; says your subscription is being refunded or auto-renewed/auto-debited; and all pre-recorded messages. Recordings are far more likely to be malicious scams and not just telemarketer spam. All unsolicited callers with foreign accents, usually Indian or Filipino, are usually scams. Filipino scammers tend to speak better English than Indian scammers. Filipinos speak English with a subtle accent having a slight trill. Scams often say that you inquired about a job, insurance, social security benefits, or that you previously contacted them or visited their website. A common India scam plays a fake Amazon recording. Amazon account updates are emailed, not robo-dialed. Many banks use automated fraud alert calls to confirm a suspicious purchase, but verify the number that the recording tells you to phone or just call the number printed on your credit card. India scammers impersonate AT&T DirecTV, Comcast, or a cable/Internet company, offering fake discounts or service upgrades. Indians impersonate the IRS and Social Security Administration. The IRS/SSA never make unsolicited calls and never threaten to arrest you; they initiate contact via postal mail. Real lawsuits are not phoned in, especially not using pre-recorded threats lacking details; legal notices are mailed/couriered. The police, FBI, DEA never phone to threaten arrest; they show up in person with a warrant. Scammers try to gain your trust by saying your name when they call, but their autodialer automatically displays your name or says your name in a recording when your number is dialed using phone databases that list millions of names and addresses. Scammers often call using an initial recording speaking English, Spanish, or Chinese that is easily generated using text-to-speech translation software to disguise the origin of their India phone room. Some speech synthesis software sound robotic, but others sound natural. To hide their foreign accents, some India scammers use non-Indians in their phone room. Scammers often use interactive voice response (IVR) robotic software that combines voice recognition with artificial intelligence, speaks English with American voices, and responds based on your replies. IVR calls begin with: "Hi, this is fake_name, I am a fake_job_title on a recorded line, can you hear me okay?"; or "Hi, this is fake_name, how are you doing today?"; or "Hello? (pause) Are you there?"; or "Hi, may I speak to your_name?" IVR quickly asks you a short question to elicit a yes/no reply so it hangs up if it encounters voicemail. IVR robots understand basic replies and yes/no answers. To test for IVR, ask "How is the weather over there?" since IVR cannot answer complex questions and it keeps talking if you interrupt it in mid-sentence. IVR usually transfers you to the scammer, but some scams entirely use IVR with the robot asking for your credit card or SSN. A common myth is IVR calls record you saying "yes" so scammers can authorize purchases just using your "yes" voice, but scammers need more than just a recorded "yes" from you - credit cards and SSN. Phone/email scams share two common traits: the CID name/number and the "From:" header on emails are easily faked, and the intent of scam calls is malicious just as file attachments and website links on scam emails are harmful. Scams snowball for many victims. If your personal/financial data are stolen, either by being scammed, visiting a malicious website, or by a previous data breach of a business server that stores your data, then your data gets sold by scammers on the dark web who will see you as fresh meat and prey on you even more. This is why some receive 40+ scam calls everyday while others get 0 to 2 calls per day. If you provide your personal information to a phone scammer, lured by fake 80%-discounted drugs or scared by fake IRS officers, you receive even more phone scams and identity theft can take years to repair. Most unsolicited calls are scams, often with an Indian accent. No other country is infested with pandemics of phone room sweatshops filled with criminals who belong to the lowest India caste and many are thieves and rapists who were serving jail time but released early due to prison overcrowding. Scammers often shout profanities at you. Just laugh at their abusive language. Google "Hindi swear words" and memorize some favorites, e.g. call him "Rundi Ka Bacha" (son of whore) or call her "Rundi Ki Bachi" (daughter of whore). Scammers ignore the National Do-Not-Call Registry; asking scammers to stop calling is useless. You do these scammers a favor by quickly hanging up. But you ruin their scams when you slowly drag them along on the phone call, give them fake personal and credit card data (16 random digits starting with 4 for Visa, 5 for MasterCard), ask them to speak louder and repeat what they said to waste their time and energy.

January 12, 2022

none
Bank
Caller Name: Coin Bank

Scam

January 12, 2022

block
Credit Card
Caller Name: Fraud

I do not have a Citibank card…

January 11, 2022

block
Credit Card

“Unauthorized withdrawal attempted from a new device”

January 11, 2022

Scam

Psycho Susan E. Magnani sending out robocalls, per usual. She owns Emblazon Industries. She installs spyware onto people's devices, and uploads deep fakes of them too. All to get revenge on customers, employees, or anyone else that doesn't like her. Her only real business is scamming and stalking people out of their time and money. Steer clear of this lying, manipulative individual.

January 11, 2022

block
Credit Card

Says that your card is being used to open a bitcoin account. Called the bank, they said it wasn’t them.

January 10, 2022

none
Scam
Caller Name: Fraud

They always use the $1498 charge. Tons of complaints.

January 6, 2022

Foreign Language

Fake credit card or account fraud notification scam by madarchod criminals phoning from India and spoofing the actual Citibank phone number on Caller ID. This number does belong to Citibank, but it is being spoofed as a fake number on Caller ID for a fake credit card or account security and fraud alert scam by criminals calling from India to steal your credit card and Social Security numbers, bank account user login and password, and other personal and financial information. The scam may begin with a pre-recorded robotic message speaking English that is generated using text-to-speech translation software to disguise the origin of this India scam, but then you talk to the India scammer. The recording tells you that their fraud services department detected suspicious activity on your credit card or your bank account. This scam bait message is designed to scare you and the India scammer then asks for your credit card number, PIN codes, online login passwords, answers to security questions, Social Security number, and other personal information "for verification purposes". Whenever you receive a fraud alert call from a bank, credit card issuer, Amazon, Apple, UPS/FedEx/DHL, or any business, ALWAYS verify the number that they ask you to call back on, or just phone the number that is printed on the back of your credit card or the number listed on the company website. About 65% of North America scam calls come from India and 30% come from the Philippines. India scammers run hundreds of fraud, extortion, and money laundering scams every day such as posing as a fake pharmacy, fake Social Security officer saying your benefits are suspended, IRS officer collecting on fake unpaid back taxes, debt collector threatening you for fake unpaid bills, fake bank/financial/FedEx/UPS/DHL scams, pretending to offer fake health insurance, car warranty, student loan forgiveness, credit card and debt consolidation services, posing as Amazon to falsely say an unauthorized purchase was made to your credit card or your Prime membership was auto-debited from your bank, posing as Microsoft/Dell/HP/Apple to say your account has been hacked or they detected a virus on your computer, fake "we are refunding your money" or "your account has been auto-debited" scams, fake Google/Alexa listing and work-from-home scams, posing as electric utilities, Verizon, AT&T, or Comcast, fake solar panel and home purchase offers, fake fundraisers asking for donations, fake phone surveys, and the scammers try to steal your credit card, bank account/routing number, Social Security number, and personal information. India scammers often rotate through fake Social Security, subscription auto-renewal, pharmacy, and pre-approved loan scams on the same day. Philippines scammers focus more on auto/home/health/life insurance, Social Security and Medicare identity theft. Scammers use disposable VoIP phone numbers (e.g. MagicJack devices) or they spoof fake names and numbers on Caller ID. Anyone can use telecom software to phone with a fake CID name and number. Scammers spoof thousands of fake 8xx toll-free numbers. CID is useless with scam calls unless the scam asks you to phone them back. CID area codes are never the origin of scam calls since scams use spoofed CID numbers from across the US and Canada, numbers belonging to unsuspecting people, invalid area codes, and fake foreign country CID numbers; e.g. fake women crying "help me" emergency scams often spoof Mexico and Middle East CID numbers. Scammers often spoof the actual phone numbers of businesses such as Apple, Verizon, and banks to trick you into thinking the call is valid. How can you avoid being scammed by phone calls? NEVER trust any unsolicited caller who: sells something (most unsolicited calls are scams so your odds of saving money are very poor); asks for your Social Security number; offers a free gift or reward; threatens you with arrest/lawsuit or says you need to reply back soon (pressure tactic); asks you to access a website, download a file, wire transfer money or buy prepaid debit/gift cards; claims suspicious activity on your account; says your subscription is being refunded or auto-renewed/auto-debited; and all pre-recorded messages. Recordings are far more likely to be malicious scams and not just telemarketer spam. All unsolicited callers with foreign accents, usually Indian or Filipino, are usually scams. Filipino scammers tend to speak better English than Indian scammers. Filipinos speak English with a subtle accent having a slight trill. Scams often say that you inquired about a job, insurance, social security benefits, or that you previously contacted them or visited their website. A common India scam plays a fake Amazon recording. Amazon account updates are emailed, not robo-dialed. Many banks use automated fraud alert calls to confirm a suspicious purchase, but verify the number that the recording tells you to phone or just call the number printed on your credit card. India scammers impersonate AT&T DirecTV, Comcast, or a cable/Internet company, offering fake discounts or service upgrades. Indians impersonate the IRS and Social Security Administration. The IRS/SSA never make unsolicited calls and never threaten to arrest you; they initiate contact via postal mail. Real lawsuits are not phoned in, especially not using pre-recorded threats lacking details; legal notices are mailed/couriered. The police, FBI, DEA never phone to threaten arrest; they show up in person with a warrant. Scammers try to gain your trust by saying your name when they call, but their autodialer automatically displays your name or says your name in a recording when your number is dialed using phone databases that list millions of names and addresses. Scammers often call using an initial recording speaking English, Spanish, or Chinese that is easily generated using text-to-speech translation software to disguise the origin of their India phone room. Some speech synthesis software sound robotic, but others sound natural. To hide their foreign accents, some India scammers use non-Indians in their phone room. Scammers often use interactive voice response (IVR) robotic software that combines voice recognition with artificial intelligence, speaks English with American voices, and responds based on your replies. IVR calls begin with: "Hi, this is fake_name, I am a fake_job_title on a recorded line, can you hear me okay?"; or "Hi, this is fake_name, how are you doing today?"; or "Hello? (pause) Are you there?"; or "Hi, may I speak to your_name?" IVR quickly asks you a short question to elicit a yes/no reply so it hangs up if it encounters voicemail. IVR robots understand basic replies and yes/no answers. To test for IVR, ask "How is the weather over there?" since IVR cannot answer complex questions and it keeps talking if you interrupt it in mid-sentence. IVR usually transfers you to the scammer, but some scams entirely use IVR with the robot asking for your credit card or SSN. A common myth is IVR calls record you saying "yes" so scammers can authorize purchases just using your "yes" voice, but scammers need more than just a recorded "yes" from you - credit cards and SSN. Phone/email scams share two common traits: the CID name/number and the "From:" header on emails are easily faked, and the intent of scam calls is malicious just as file attachments and website links on scam emails are harmful. Scams snowball for many victims. If your personal/financial data are stolen, either by being scammed, visiting a malicious website, or by a previous data breach of a business server that stores your data, then your data gets sold by scammers on the dark web who will see you as fresh meat and prey on you even more. This is why some receive 40+ scam calls everyday while others get 0 to 2 calls per day. If you provide your personal information to a phone scammer, lured by fake 80%-discounted drugs or scared by fake IRS officers, you receive even more phone scams and identity theft can take years to repair. Most unsolicited calls are scams, often with an Indian accent. No other country is infested with pandemics of phone room sweatshops filled with criminals who belong to the lowest India caste and many are thieves and rapists who were serving jail time but released early due to prison overcrowding. Scammers often shout profanities at you. Just laugh at their abusive language. Google "Hindi swear words" and memorize some favorites, e.g. call him "Rundi Ka Bacha" (son of whore) or call her "Rundi Ki Bachi" (daughter of whore). Scammers ignore the National Do-Not-Call Registry; asking scammers to stop calling is useless. You do these scammers a favor by quickly hanging up. But you ruin their scams when you slowly drag them along on the phone call, give them fake personal and credit card data (16 random digits starting with 4 for Visa, 5 for MasterCard), ask them to speak louder and repeat what they said to waste their time and energy.

January 6, 2022

Foreign Language

Fake solar energy sales scam call by Puta'ng Ina Ka criminals phoning from the Philippines. These criminals phone from the Philippines, stealing your credit card number and then they disappear. They pretend to offer solar energy panels for your home, often using the scam bait of "free solar energy at no cost to you", ask a lot of personal questions about you for identity theft, and then ask for your credit card number or also your Social Security number under the pretense of "verifying your information" and securing an appointment. The initial solar energy presentation is ALL FAKE and just a setup to acquire your personal information and credit card numbers. There are some reputable solar energy companies. But as with all home improvement contractors, you really should deal with a local business that has an office in your city. All of these solar energy and home improvement companies that make unsolicited calls are mostly phoning from overseas and every one of them is a scam! About 65% of North America scam calls come from India and 30% come from the Philippines. India scammers run hundreds of fraud, extortion, and money laundering scams every day such as posing as a fake pharmacy, fake Social Security officer saying your benefits are suspended, IRS officer collecting on fake unpaid back taxes, debt collector threatening you for fake unpaid bills, fake bank/financial/FedEx/UPS/DHL scams, pretending to offer fake health insurance, car warranty, student loan forgiveness, credit card and debt consolidation services, posing as Amazon to falsely say an unauthorized purchase was made to your credit card or your Prime membership was auto-debited from your bank, posing as Microsoft/Dell/HP/Apple to say your account has been hacked or they detected a virus on your computer, fake "we are refunding your money" or "your account has been auto-debited" scams, fake Google/Alexa listing and work-from-home scams, posing as electric utilities, Verizon, AT&T, or Comcast, fake solar panel and home purchase offers, fake fundraisers asking for donations, fake phone surveys, and the scammers try to steal your credit card, bank account/routing number, Social Security number, and personal information. India scammers often rotate through fake Social Security, subscription auto-renewal, pharmacy, and pre-approved loan scams on the same day. Philippines scammers focus more on auto/home/health/life insurance, Social Security and Medicare identity theft. Scammers use disposable VoIP phone numbers (e.g. MagicJack devices) or they spoof fake names and numbers on Caller ID. Anyone can use telecom software to phone with a fake CID name and number. Scammers spoof thousands of fake 8xx toll-free numbers. CID is useless with scam calls unless the scam asks you to phone them back. CID area codes are never the origin of scam calls since scams use spoofed CID numbers from across the US and Canada, numbers belonging to unsuspecting people, invalid area codes, and fake foreign country CID numbers; e.g. fake women crying "help me" emergency scams often spoof Mexico and Middle East CID numbers. Scammers often spoof the actual phone numbers of businesses such as Apple, Verizon, and banks to trick you into thinking the call is valid. How can you avoid being scammed by phone calls? NEVER trust any unsolicited caller who: sells something (most unsolicited calls are scams so your odds of saving money are very poor); asks for your Social Security number; offers a free gift or reward; threatens you with arrest/lawsuit or says you need to reply back soon (pressure tactic); asks you to access a website, download a file, wire transfer money or buy prepaid debit/gift cards; claims suspicious activity on your account; says your subscription is being refunded or auto-renewed/auto-debited; and all pre-recorded messages. Recordings are far more likely to be malicious scams and not just telemarketer spam. All unsolicited callers with foreign accents, usually Indian or Filipino, are usually scams. Filipino scammers tend to speak better English than Indian scammers. Filipinos speak English with a subtle accent having a slight trill. Scams often say that you inquired about a job, insurance, social security benefits, or that you previously contacted them or visited their website. A common India scam plays a fake Amazon recording. Amazon account updates are emailed, not robo-dialed. Many banks use automated fraud alert calls to confirm a suspicious purchase, but verify the number that the recording tells you to phone or just call the number printed on your credit card. India scammers impersonate AT&T DirecTV, Comcast, or a cable/Internet company, offering fake discounts or service upgrades. Indians impersonate the IRS and Social Security Administration. The IRS/SSA never make unsolicited calls and never threaten to arrest you; they initiate contact via postal mail. Real lawsuits are not phoned in, especially not using pre-recorded threats lacking details; legal notices are mailed/couriered. The police, FBI, DEA never phone to threaten arrest; they show up in person with a warrant. Scammers try to gain your trust by saying your name when they call, but their autodialer automatically displays your name or says your name in a recording when your number is dialed using phone databases that list millions of names and addresses. Scammers often call using an initial recording speaking English, Spanish, or Chinese that is easily generated using text-to-speech translation software to disguise the origin of their India phone room. Some speech synthesis software sound robotic, but others sound natural. To hide their foreign accents, some India scammers use non-Indians in their phone room. Scammers often use interactive voice response (IVR) robotic software that combines voice recognition with artificial intelligence, speaks English with American voices, and responds based on your replies. IVR calls begin with: "Hi, this is fake_name, I am a fake_job_title on a recorded line, can you hear me okay?"; or "Hi, this is fake_name, how are you doing today?"; or "Hello? (pause) Are you there?"; or "Hi, may I speak to your_name?" IVR quickly asks you a short question to elicit a yes/no reply so it hangs up if it encounters voicemail. IVR robots understand basic replies and yes/no answers. To test for IVR, ask "How is the weather over there?" since IVR cannot answer complex questions and it keeps talking if you interrupt it in mid-sentence. IVR usually transfers you to the scammer, but some scams entirely use IVR with the robot asking for your credit card or SSN. A common myth is IVR calls record you saying "yes" so scammers can authorize purchases just using your "yes" voice, but scammers need more than just a recorded "yes" from you - credit cards and SSN. Phone/email scams share two common traits: the CID name/number and the "From:" header on emails are easily faked, and the intent of scam calls is malicious just as file attachments and website links on scam emails are harmful. Scams snowball for many victims. If your personal/financial data are stolen, either by being scammed, visiting a malicious website, or by a previous data breach of a business server that stores your data, then your data gets sold by scammers on the dark web who will see you as fresh meat and prey on you even more. This is why some receive 40+ scam calls everyday while others get 0 to 2 calls per day. If you provide your personal information to a phone scammer, lured by fake 80%-discounted drugs or scared by fake IRS officers, you receive even more phone scams and identity theft can take years to repair. Most unsolicited calls are scams, often with an Indian accent. No other country is infested with pandemics of phone room sweatshops filled with criminals who belong to the lowest India caste and many are thieves and rapists who were serving jail time but released early due to prison overcrowding. Scammers often shout profanities at you. Just laugh at their abusive language. Google "Hindi swear words" and memorize some favorites, e.g. call him "Rundi Ka Bacha" (son of whore) or call her "Rundi Ki Bachi" (daughter of whore). Scammers ignore the National Do-Not-Call Registry; asking scammers to stop calling is useless. You do these scammers a favor by quickly hanging up. But you ruin their scams when you slowly drag them along on the phone call, give them fake personal and credit card data (16 random digits starting with 4 for Visa, 5 for MasterCard), ask them to speak louder and repeat what they said to waste their time and energy.

January 4, 2022

Scam
Caller Name: Citi

Spoofed number pretending to be Citibank, claiming $1498 charge on card

January 4, 2022

block
Credit Card
Caller Name: Fraud

Fraud

January 3, 2022

block
Bank
Caller Name: Citi

Fraud

December 22, 2021

block
Scam
Caller Name: Credit Card SCAM

Citibank SCAM

December 21, 2021

Foreign Language

Fake credit card or account fraud notification scam by madarchod criminals phoning from India and spoofing the actual Citibank phone number on Caller ID. This number does belong to Citibank, but it is being spoofed as a fake number on Caller ID for a fake credit card or account security and fraud alert scam by criminals calling from India to steal your credit card and Social Security numbers, bank account user login and password, and other personal and financial information. The scam may begin with a pre-recorded robotic message speaking English that is generated using text-to-speech translation software to disguise the origin of this India scam, but then you talk to the India scammer. The recording tells you that their fraud services department detected suspicious activity on your credit card or your bank account. This scam bait message is designed to scare you and the India scammer then asks for your credit card number, PIN codes, online login passwords, answers to security questions, Social Security number, and other personal information "for verification purposes". Whenever you receive a fraud alert call from a bank, credit card issuer, Amazon, Apple, UPS/FedEx/DHL, or any business, ALWAYS verify the number that they ask you to call back on, or just phone the number that is printed on the back of your credit card or the number listed on the company website. About 65% of North America scam calls come from India and 30% come from the Philippines. India scammers run hundreds of fraud, extortion, and money laundering scams every day such as posing as a fake pharmacy, fake Social Security officer saying your benefits are suspended, IRS officer collecting on fake unpaid back taxes, debt collector threatening you for fake unpaid bills, fake bank/financial/FedEx/UPS/DHL scams, pretending to offer fake health insurance, car warranty, student loan forgiveness, credit card and debt consolidation services, posing as Amazon to falsely say an unauthorized purchase was made to your credit card or your Prime membership was auto-debited from your bank, posing as Microsoft/Dell/HP/Apple to say your account has been hacked or they detected a virus on your computer, fake "we are refunding your money" or "your account has been auto-debited" scams, fake Google/Alexa listing and work-from-home scams, posing as electric utilities, Verizon, AT&T, or Comcast, fake solar panel and home purchase offers, fake fundraisers asking for donations, fake phone surveys, and the scammers try to steal your credit card, bank account/routing number, Social Security number, and personal information. India scammers often rotate through fake Social Security, subscription auto-renewal, pharmacy, and pre-approved loan scams on the same day. Philippines scammers focus more on auto/home/health/life insurance, Social Security and Medicare identity theft. Scammers use disposable VoIP phone numbers (e.g. MagicJack devices) or they spoof fake names and numbers on Caller ID. Anyone can use telecom software to phone with a fake CID name and number. Scammers spoof thousands of fake 8xx toll-free numbers. CID is useless with scam calls unless the scam asks you to phone them back. CID area codes are never the origin of scam calls since scams use spoofed CID numbers from across the US and Canada, numbers belonging to unsuspecting people, invalid area codes, and fake foreign country CID numbers; e.g. fake women crying "help me" emergency scams often spoof Mexico and Middle East CID numbers. Scammers often spoof the actual phone numbers of businesses such as Apple, Verizon, and banks to trick you into thinking the call is valid. How can you avoid being scammed by phone calls? NEVER trust any unsolicited caller who: sells something (most unsolicited calls are scams so your odds of saving money are very poor); asks for your Social Security number; offers a free gift or reward; threatens you with arrest/lawsuit or says you need to reply back soon (pressure tactic); asks you to access a website, download a file, wire transfer money or buy prepaid debit/gift cards; claims suspicious activity on your account; says your subscription is being refunded or auto-renewed/auto-debited; and all pre-recorded messages. Recordings are far more likely to be malicious scams and not just telemarketer spam. All unsolicited callers with foreign accents, usually Indian or Filipino, are usually scams. Filipino scammers tend to speak better English than Indian scammers. Filipinos speak English with a subtle accent having a slight trill. Scams often say that you inquired about a job, insurance, social security benefits, or that you previously contacted them or visited their website. A common India scam plays a fake Amazon recording. Amazon account updates are emailed, not robo-dialed. Many banks use automated fraud alert calls to confirm a suspicious purchase, but verify the number that the recording tells you to phone or just call the number printed on your credit card. India scammers impersonate AT&T DirecTV, Comcast, or a cable/Internet company, offering fake discounts or service upgrades. Indians impersonate the IRS and Social Security Administration. The IRS/SSA never make unsolicited calls and never threaten to arrest you; they initiate contact via postal mail. Real lawsuits are not phoned in, especially not using pre-recorded threats lacking details; legal notices are mailed/couriered. The police, FBI, DEA never phone to threaten arrest; they show up in person with a warrant. Scammers try to gain your trust by saying your name when they call, but their autodialer automatically displays your name or says your name in a recording when your number is dialed using phone databases that list millions of names and addresses. Scammers often call using an initial recording speaking English, Spanish, or Chinese that is easily generated using text-to-speech translation software to disguise the origin of their India phone room. Some speech synthesis software sound robotic, but others sound natural. To hide their foreign accents, some India scammers use non-Indians in their phone room. Scammers often use interactive voice response (IVR) robotic software that combines voice recognition with artificial intelligence, speaks English with American voices, and responds based on your replies. IVR calls begin with: "Hi, this is fake_name, I am a fake_job_title on a recorded line, can you hear me okay?"; or "Hi, this is fake_name, how are you doing today?"; or "Hello? (pause) Are you there?"; or "Hi, may I speak to your_name?" IVR quickly asks you a short question to elicit a yes/no reply so it hangs up if it encounters voicemail. IVR robots understand basic replies and yes/no answers. To test for IVR, ask "How is the weather over there?" since IVR cannot answer complex questions and it keeps talking if you interrupt it in mid-sentence. IVR usually transfers you to the scammer, but some scams entirely use IVR with the robot asking for your credit card or SSN. A common myth is IVR calls record you saying "yes" so scammers can authorize purchases just using your "yes" voice, but scammers need more than just a recorded "yes" from you - credit cards and SSN. Phone/email scams share two common traits: the CID name/number and the "From:" header on emails are easily faked, and the intent of scam calls is malicious just as file attachments and website links on scam emails are harmful. Scams snowball for many victims. If your personal/financial data are stolen, either by being scammed, visiting a malicious website, or by a previous data breach of a business server that stores your data, then your data gets sold by scammers on the dark web who will see you as fresh meat and prey on you even more. This is why some receive 40+ scam calls everyday while others get 0 to 2 calls per day. If you provide your personal information to a phone scammer, lured by fake 80%-discounted drugs or scared by fake IRS officers, you receive even more phone scams and identity theft can take years to repair. Most unsolicited calls are scams, often with an Indian accent. No other country is infested with pandemics of phone room sweatshops filled with criminals who belong to the lowest India caste and many are thieves and rapists who were serving jail time but released early due to prison overcrowding. Scammers often shout profanities at you. Just laugh at their abusive language. Google "Hindi swear words" and memorize some favorites, e.g. call him "Rundi Ka Bacha" (son of whore) or call her "Rundi Ki Bachi" (daughter of whore). Scammers ignore the National Do-Not-Call Registry; asking scammers to stop calling is useless. You do these scammers a favor by quickly hanging up. But you ruin their scams when you slowly drag them along on the phone call, give them fake personal and credit card data (16 random digits starting with 4 for Visa, 5 for MasterCard), ask them to speak louder and repeat what they said to waste their time and energy.

December 21, 2021

none
Scam
Caller Name: Bank Account

I do not have an account with this bank

December 21, 2021

block
Customer Service
Caller Name: Trying to get personal information

Uses tactic of saying a large amount has been charged on your card.

Your other is your mom

December 20, 2021

Scam

Psycho Susan E. Magnani sending out robocalls, per usual. She owns Emblazon Industries. She installs spyware onto people's devices, and uploads deep fakes of them too. All to get revenge on customers, employees, or anyone else that doesn't like her. Her only real business is scamming and stalking people out of their time and money. Steer clear of this lying, manipulative individual.

Your other is your mom

December 20, 2021

Bank
Caller Name: Phishy City Bank

1800-374-9700: this is a scam. Just a bunch of smelly hillbillies engaging in incest...

December 19, 2021

block

Citibank spam

December 19, 2021

block
Caller Name: Scammer from fake Citibank

Scammer saying I had fraud charges on my account. I don’t even have Citibank.

December 19, 2021

block
Caller Name: Spam

Claim to be from Citibank name of bank incorrectly spelled. Not actual bank number

December 19, 2021

none
Bank
Caller Name: Credit card Dept

Yes please allow

My other is your mom

December 18, 2021

Bank
Caller Name: Scam city bank

1800-374-9700, this a scam and are just a bunch of smelly Indian ni@@ers

SR

December 15, 2021

Bank
Caller Name: Citibank

Scam

Lea

December 15, 2021

Scam
Caller Name: Supposedly Citibank

I don't have any Citibank accounts or any related services. IT'S A SCAM. IT'S BEEN ON THE NEWS!!!

John A

December 15, 2021

Bank
Caller Name: 800 374-9700

your City Bank customer we found some suspicious activity on your City bank account your Citibank card has been charged of 1498 dollars if you did not authorize this transaction please press 1 to connect with City fraud specialist for dispute please press 1 for...

December 15, 2021

block

Fraud scam

December 13, 2021

block

Bit coin scam

December 13, 2021

Scam
Caller Name: citibank

complete fraud attempt pretending to be citibank credit card with a fraudulent charge

Martin L

December 12, 2021

Scam

I got a voicemail today ( 12/12/2021 ) at 2:02PM. The Caller ID name was Citibankonline. But this was a phony call spoofing Citibank’s number. I know this is a scam. First, I have never had a Citibank account or card or have done business with the bank. Second, I have in the past had a legitimate problem transaction on my account. It wasn’t fraud. There was a malfunction when I was using my ATM card (for another bank) on their ATM machine which mimicked a fraudulent attempt. So the phone call wasn’t unexpected. Also the format of the call was very different. The voicemail had my name inserted in it by a voice synthesizer ( this was many years ago so it sounded very stilted and mechanical ), it had my (partial) ATM #, and a callback # rather than ‘press 1 to connect’ (although scammers can develop callback #’s , although that would mean a real permanent # which they rarely do but it is a possibility so a callback can still mean a scammer call). In other words, in my experience a real bank sends a voicemail that is not in the model of a typical telemarketer. So this voicemail is an obvious scam.

December 10, 2021

block
Bank
Caller Name: FRAUD

Fraud

December 10, 2021

Bank
Caller Name: FAKE CITIBANK

This has been on going for the last two weeks December 1, 2021 and up until today December 10, 2021, since I don't answer voice mails have been left asking me did I okay a $5,000.00 transaction and if I did not to call back to the number given 800 374 9700 right away. I have blocked this number from my phone.

December 10, 2021

Foreign Language

Fake credit card or account fraud notification scam by madarchod criminals phoning from India and spoofing the actual Citibank phone number on Caller ID. This number does belong to Citibank, but it is being spoofed as a fake number on Caller ID for a fake credit card or account security and fraud alert scam by criminals calling from India to steal your credit card and Social Security numbers, bank account user login and password, and other personal and financial information. The scam may begin with a pre-recorded robotic message speaking English that is generated using text-to-speech translation software to disguise the origin of this India scam, but then you talk to the India scammer. The recording tells you that their fraud services department detected suspicious activity on your credit card or your bank account. This scam bait message is designed to scare you and the India scammer then asks for your credit card number, PIN codes, online login passwords, answers to security questions, Social Security number, and other personal information "for verification purposes". Whenever you receive a fraud alert call from a bank, credit card issuer, Amazon, Apple, UPS/FedEx/DHL, or any business, ALWAYS verify the number that they ask you to call back on, or just phone the number that is printed on the back of your credit card or the number listed on the company website. About 65% of North America scam calls come from India and 30% come from the Philippines. India scammers run hundreds of fraud, extortion, and money laundering scams every day such as posing as a fake pharmacy, fake Social Security officer saying your benefits are suspended, IRS officer collecting on fake unpaid back taxes, debt collector threatening you for fake unpaid bills, fake bank/financial/FedEx/UPS/DHL scams, pretending to offer fake health insurance, car warranty, student loan forgiveness, credit card and debt consolidation services, posing as Amazon to falsely say an unauthorized purchase was made to your credit card or your Prime membership was auto-debited from your bank, posing as Microsoft/Dell/HP/Apple to say your account has been hacked or they detected a virus on your computer, fake "we are refunding your money" or "your account has been auto-debited" scams, fake Google/Alexa listing and work-from-home scams, posing as electric utilities, Verizon, AT&T, or Comcast, fake solar panel and home purchase offers, fake fundraisers asking for donations, fake phone surveys, and the scammers try to steal your credit card, bank account/routing number, Social Security number, and personal information. India scammers often rotate through fake Social Security, subscription auto-renewal, pharmacy, and pre-approved loan scams on the same day. Philippines scammers focus more on auto/home/health/life insurance, Social Security and Medicare identity theft. Scammers use disposable VoIP phone numbers (e.g. MagicJack devices) or they spoof fake names and numbers on Caller ID. Anyone can use telecom software to phone with a fake CID name and number. Scammers spoof thousands of fake 8xx toll-free numbers. CID is useless with scam calls unless the scam asks you to phone them back. CID area codes are never the origin of scam calls since scams use spoofed CID numbers from across the US and Canada, numbers belonging to unsuspecting people, invalid area codes, and fake foreign country CID numbers; e.g. fake women crying "help me" emergency scams often spoof Mexico and Middle East CID numbers. Scammers often spoof the actual phone numbers of businesses such as Apple, Verizon, and banks to trick you into thinking the call is valid. How can you avoid being scammed by phone calls? NEVER trust any unsolicited caller who: sells something (most unsolicited calls are scams so your odds of saving money are very poor); asks for your Social Security number; offers a free gift or reward; threatens you with arrest/lawsuit or says you need to reply back soon (pressure tactic); asks you to access a website, download a file, wire transfer money or buy prepaid debit/gift cards; claims suspicious activity on your account; says your subscription is being refunded or auto-renewed/auto-debited; and all pre-recorded messages. Recordings are far more likely to be malicious scams and not just telemarketer spam. All unsolicited callers with foreign accents, usually Indian or Filipino, are usually scams. Filipino scammers tend to speak better English than Indian scammers. Filipinos speak English with a subtle accent having a slight trill. Scams often say that you inquired about a job, insurance, social security benefits, or that you previously contacted them or visited their website. A common India scam plays a fake Amazon recording. Amazon account updates are emailed, not robo-dialed. Many banks use automated fraud alert calls to confirm a suspicious purchase, but verify the number that the recording tells you to phone or just call the number printed on your credit card. India scammers impersonate AT&T DirecTV, Comcast, or a cable/Internet company, offering fake discounts or service upgrades. Indians impersonate the IRS and Social Security Administration. The IRS/SSA never make unsolicited calls and never threaten to arrest you; they initiate contact via postal mail. Real lawsuits are not phoned in, especially not using pre-recorded threats lacking details; legal notices are mailed/couriered. The police, FBI, DEA never phone to threaten arrest; they show up in person with a warrant. Scammers try to gain your trust by saying your name when they call, but their autodialer automatically displays your name or says your name in a recording when your number is dialed using phone databases that list millions of names and addresses. Scammers often call using an initial recording speaking English, Spanish, or Chinese that is easily generated using text-to-speech translation software to disguise the origin of their India phone room. Some speech synthesis software sound robotic, but others sound natural. To hide their foreign accents, some India scammers use non-Indians in their phone room. Scammers often use interactive voice response (IVR) robotic software that combines voice recognition with artificial intelligence, speaks English with American voices, and responds based on your replies. IVR calls begin with: "Hi, this is fake_name, I am a fake_job_title on a recorded line, can you hear me okay?"; or "Hi, this is fake_name, how are you doing today?"; or "Hello? (pause) Are you there?"; or "Hi, may I speak to your_name?" IVR quickly asks you a short question to elicit a yes/no reply so it hangs up if it encounters voicemail. IVR robots understand basic replies and yes/no answers. To test for IVR, ask "How is the weather over there?" since IVR cannot answer complex questions and it keeps talking if you interrupt it in mid-sentence. IVR usually transfers you to the scammer, but some scams entirely use IVR with the robot asking for your credit card or SSN. A common myth is IVR calls record you saying "yes" so scammers can authorize purchases just using your "yes" voice, but scammers need more than just a recorded "yes" from you - credit cards and SSN. Phone/email scams share two common traits: the CID name/number and the "From:" header on emails are easily faked, and the intent of scam calls is malicious just as file attachments and website links on scam emails are harmful. Scams snowball for many victims. If your personal/financial data are stolen, either by being scammed, visiting a malicious website, or by a previous data breach of a business server that stores your data, then your data gets sold by scammers on the dark web who will see you as fresh meat and prey on you even more. This is why some receive 40+ scam calls everyday while others get 0 to 2 calls per day. If you provide your personal information to a phone scammer, lured by fake 80%-discounted drugs or scared by fake IRS officers, you receive even more phone scams and identity theft can take years to repair. Most unsolicited calls are scams, often with an Indian accent. No other country is infested with pandemics of phone room sweatshops filled with criminals who belong to the lowest India caste and many are thieves and rapists who were serving jail time but released early due to prison overcrowding. Scammers often shout profanities at you. Just laugh at their abusive language. Google "Hindi swear words" and memorize some favorites, e.g. call him "Rundi Ka Bacha" (son of whore) or call her "Rundi Ki Bachi" (daughter of whore). Scammers ignore the National Do-Not-Call Registry; asking scammers to stop calling is useless. You do these scammers a favor by quickly hanging up. But you ruin their scams when you slowly drag them along on the phone call, give them fake personal and credit card data (16 random digits starting with 4 for Visa, 5 for MasterCard), ask them to speak louder and repeat what they said to waste their time and energy.

December 10, 2021

block
Bank
Caller Name: Scam

Spam

December 10, 2021

Scam

Psycho Susan E. Magnani sending out robocalls, per usual. She owns Emblazon Industries. She installs spyware onto people's devices, and uploads deep fakes of them too. All to get revenge on customers, employees, or anyone else that doesn't like her. Her only real business is scamming and stalking people out of their time and money. Steer clear of this lying, manipulative individual.

Margaret

December 10, 2021

Scam
Caller Name: Citi Bank

The robocall message said that a charge of $1,500.00 was made to my Citi Bank credit card. However, I do not have a Citi Bank credit card. My adult daughter reported (800) 374-9700 to the FTC, The National Do Not Call Registry and to the FCC.

December 9, 2021

none

scam

December 9, 2021

none
Scam

Coinbase scam

December 9, 2021

block
Bank
Caller Name: Phishing - CitiBank

Phishing - CitiBank

December 9, 2021

Scam

So many rich scammers that continue harassing people..for no reason? Lol. What a bunch of low life creeps. At least broke scammers do it out of necessity...

December 9, 2021

block
Scam

They are scammers acting like Citibank! They have changed their caller ID. BE CAREFUL. They will tell you there was a fraudulent charge on your account.

Britt

December 8, 2021

Scam
Caller Name: Citi Bank

Recorded message from "Citibank" claiming a charge was made to my account for over $400. I don't have an account with Citibank nor have I ever had an account with them. Scam call.

December 8, 2021

none
Credit Card
Caller Name: Credit charges $1498

Scam. Same amount continuously

December 6, 2021

none
Community Alert
Caller Name: Medicare Fraud

Demands payment

December 5, 2021

block
Bank
Caller Name: Unauthorized charge

Fake number phishing for personal information. I verified this with the actual bank representative and their fraud department

December 3, 2021

none
Bank
Caller Name: Scam

I don’t have a Citibank Account

December 3, 2021

block
Credit Card
Caller Name: Fraud

Pretends large amounts of money have been charged to credit cards (Citibank)

November 30, 2021

Foreign Language

Fake credit card or account fraud notification scam by madarchod criminals phoning from India and spoofing the actual Citibank phone number on Caller ID. This number does belong to Citibank, but it is being spoofed as a fake number on Caller ID for a fake credit card or account security and fraud alert scam by criminals calling from India to steal your credit card and Social Security numbers, bank account user login and password, and other personal and financial information. The scam may begin with a pre-recorded robotic message speaking English that is generated using text-to-speech translation software to disguise the origin of this India scam, but then you talk to the India scammer. The recording tells you that their fraud services department detected suspicious activity on your credit card or your bank account. This scam bait message is designed to scare you and the India scammer then asks for your credit card number, PIN codes, online login passwords, answers to security questions, Social Security number, and other personal information "for verification purposes". Whenever you receive a fraud alert call from a bank, credit card issuer, Amazon, Apple, UPS/FedEx/DHL, or any business, ALWAYS verify the number that they ask you to call back on, or just phone the number that is printed on the back of your credit card or the number listed on the company website. About 65% of North America scam calls come from India and 30% come from the Philippines. India scammers run hundreds of fraud, extortion, and money laundering scams every day such as posing as a fake pharmacy, fake Social Security officer saying your benefits are suspended, IRS officer collecting on fake unpaid back taxes, debt collector threatening you for fake unpaid bills, fake bank/financial/FedEx/UPS/DHL scams, pretending to offer fake health insurance, car warranty, student loan forgiveness, credit card and debt consolidation services, posing as Amazon to falsely say an unauthorized purchase was made to your credit card or your Prime membership was auto-debited from your bank, posing as Microsoft/Dell/HP/Apple to say your account has been hacked or they detected a virus on your computer, fake "we are refunding your money" or "your account has been auto-debited" scams, fake Google/Alexa listing and work-from-home scams, posing as electric utilities, Verizon, AT&T, or Comcast, fake solar panel and home purchase offers, fake fundraisers asking for donations, fake phone surveys, and the scammers try to steal your credit card, bank account/routing number, Social Security number, and personal information. India scammers often rotate through fake Social Security, subscription auto-renewal, pharmacy, and pre-approved loan scams on the same day. Philippines scammers focus more on auto/home/health/life insurance, Social Security and Medicare identity theft. Scammers use disposable VoIP phone numbers (e.g. MagicJack devices) or they spoof fake names and numbers on Caller ID. Anyone can use telecom software to phone with a fake CID name and number. Scammers spoof thousands of fake 8xx toll-free numbers. CID is useless with scam calls unless the scam asks you to phone them back. CID area codes are never the origin of scam calls since scams use spoofed CID numbers from across the US and Canada, numbers belonging to unsuspecting people, invalid area codes, and fake foreign country CID numbers; e.g. fake women crying "help me" emergency scams often spoof Mexico and Middle East CID numbers. Scammers often spoof the actual phone numbers of businesses such as Apple, Verizon, and banks to trick you into thinking the call is valid. How can you avoid being scammed by phone calls? NEVER trust any unsolicited caller who: sells something (most unsolicited calls are scams so your odds of saving money are very poor); asks for your Social Security number; offers a free gift or reward; threatens you with arrest/lawsuit or says you need to reply back soon (pressure tactic); asks you to access a website, download a file, wire transfer money or buy prepaid debit/gift cards; claims suspicious activity on your account; says your subscription is being refunded or auto-renewed/auto-debited; and all pre-recorded messages. Recordings are far more likely to be malicious scams and not just telemarketer spam. All unsolicited callers with foreign accents, usually Indian or Filipino, are usually scams. Filipino scammers tend to speak better English than Indian scammers. Filipinos speak English with a subtle accent having a slight trill. Scams often say that you inquired about a job, insurance, social security benefits, or that you previously contacted them or visited their website. A common India scam plays a fake Amazon recording. Amazon account updates are emailed, not robo-dialed. Many banks use automated fraud alert calls to confirm a suspicious purchase, but verify the number that the recording tells you to phone or just call the number printed on your credit card. India scammers impersonate AT&T DirecTV, Comcast, or a cable/Internet company, offering fake discounts or service upgrades. Indians impersonate the IRS and Social Security Administration. The IRS/SSA never make unsolicited calls and never threaten to arrest you; they initiate contact via postal mail. Real lawsuits are not phoned in, especially not using pre-recorded threats lacking details; legal notices are mailed/couriered. The police, FBI, DEA never phone to threaten arrest; they show up in person with a warrant. Scammers try to gain your trust by saying your name when they call, but their autodialer automatically displays your name or says your name in a recording when your number is dialed using phone databases that list millions of names and addresses. Scammers often call using an initial recording speaking English, Spanish, or Chinese that is easily generated using text-to-speech translation software to disguise the origin of their India phone room. Some speech synthesis software sound robotic, but others sound natural. To hide their foreign accents, some India scammers use non-Indians in their phone room. Scammers often use interactive voice response (IVR) robotic software that combines voice recognition with artificial intelligence, speaks English with American voices, and responds based on your replies. IVR calls begin with: "Hi, this is fake_name, I am a fake_job_title on a recorded line, can you hear me okay?"; or "Hi, this is fake_name, how are you doing today?"; or "Hello? (pause) Are you there?"; or "Hi, may I speak to your_name?" IVR quickly asks you a short question to elicit a yes/no reply so it hangs up if it encounters voicemail. IVR robots understand basic replies and yes/no answers. To test for IVR, ask "How is the weather over there?" since IVR cannot answer complex questions and it keeps talking if you interrupt it in mid-sentence. IVR usually transfers you to the scammer, but some scams entirely use IVR with the robot asking for your credit card or SSN. A common myth is IVR calls record you saying "yes" so scammers can authorize purchases just using your "yes" voice, but scammers need more than just a recorded "yes" from you - credit cards and SSN. Phone/email scams share two common traits: the CID name/number and the "From:" header on emails are easily faked, and the intent of scam calls is malicious just as file attachments and website links on scam emails are harmful. Scams snowball for many victims. If your personal/financial data are stolen, either by being scammed, visiting a malicious website, or by a previous data breach of a business server that stores your data, then your data gets sold by scammers on the dark web who will see you as fresh meat and prey on you even more. This is why some receive 40+ scam calls everyday while others get 0 to 2 calls per day. If you provide your personal information to a phone scammer, lured by fake 80%-discounted drugs or scared by fake IRS officers, you receive even more phone scams and identity theft can take years to repair. Most unsolicited calls are scams, often with an Indian accent. No other country is infested with pandemics of phone room sweatshops filled with criminals who belong to the lowest India caste and many are thieves and rapists who were serving jail time but released early due to prison overcrowding. Scammers often shout profanities at you. Just laugh at their abusive language. Google "Hindi swear words" and memorize some favorites, e.g. call him "Rundi Ka Bacha" (son of whore) or call her "Rundi Ki Bachi" (daughter of whore). Scammers ignore the National Do-Not-Call Registry; asking scammers to stop calling is useless. You do these scammers a favor by quickly hanging up. But you ruin their scams when you slowly drag them along on the phone call, give them fake personal and credit card data (16 random digits starting with 4 for Visa, 5 for MasterCard), ask them to speak louder and repeat what they said to waste their time and energy.

November 30, 2021

Scam

Psycho Susan E. Magnani sending out robocalls, per usual. She owns Emblazon Industries. She installs spyware onto people's devices, and uploads deep fakes of them too. All to get revenge on customers, employees, or anyone else that doesn't like her. Her only real business is scamming and stalking people out of their time and money. Steer clear of this lying, manipulative individual.

November 29, 2021

Scam

Spoofed citi bank number.

November 29, 2021

none
Bank
Caller Name: Fraudulent charges for a Citicard!

I don’t have a Citibank card or account

November 29, 2021

none
Credit Card
Caller Name: Citibank

I do not have or ever had a Citibank card. Please stop this caller from calling me this has been the third cold that’s been blocked they need to be stopped. Thank you

November 28, 2021

block
Bank

Fake bank call

November 22, 2021

none
Credit Card
Caller Name: Credit card charge

Called and left a voice mail about a charge that I didn’t make

November 21, 2021

none
Bank
Caller Name: Scam

This is a phishing scam and they are doing everything they can to mask that they are trying to get your information by pretending to be an actual bank up to and including changing their caller ID to show as the bank's name. They have even gone as far as setting up a phony website. I answered the call and then called my bank and they verified that this is not one of their phone numbers and is a fraudulent phishing call. The bank also verified that I did not have an erroneous charge on my account . Do not pay attention to this phone number, do not give them any information. Always call the actual bank of an unsolicited phone call. Never answer a call that you've received directly. Always take the extra step and go around the back door to verify your account.

November 21, 2021

block
Caller Name: Scam

Spoof call

D

November 21, 2021

Caller Name: Citibank

Just got a call saying I had fraud of about 1000 dollars. Lol what a scam. I Dnt even have Citibank

rkm

November 20, 2021

Scam
Caller Name: Citibank

This is a scam. Don’t answer it.

November 19, 2021

Foreign Language

Fake credit card or account fraud notification scam by madarchod criminals phoning from India and spoofing the actual Citibank phone number on Caller ID. This number does belong to Citibank, but it is being spoofed as a fake number on Caller ID for a fake credit card or account security and fraud alert scam by criminals calling from India to steal your credit card and Social Security numbers, bank account user login and password, and other personal and financial information. The scam may begin with a pre-recorded robotic message speaking English that is generated using text-to-speech translation software to disguise the origin of this India scam, but then you talk to the India scammer. The recording tells you that their fraud services department detected suspicious activity on your credit card or your bank account. This scam bait message is designed to scare you and the India scammer then asks for your credit card number, PIN codes, online login passwords, answers to security questions, Social Security number, and other personal information "for verification purposes". Whenever you receive a fraud alert call from a bank, credit card issuer, Amazon, Apple, UPS/FedEx/DHL, or any business, ALWAYS verify the number that they ask you to call back on, or just phone the number that is printed on the back of your credit card or the number listed on the company website. About 65% of North America scam calls come from India and 30% come from the Philippines. India scammers run hundreds of fraud, extortion, and money laundering scams every day such as posing as a fake pharmacy, fake Social Security officer saying your benefits are suspended, IRS officer collecting on fake unpaid back taxes, debt collector threatening you for fake unpaid bills, fake bank/financial/FedEx/UPS/DHL scams, pretending to offer fake health insurance, car warranty, student loan forgiveness, credit card and debt consolidation services, posing as Amazon to falsely say an unauthorized purchase was made to your credit card or your Prime membership was auto-debited from your bank, posing as Microsoft/Dell/HP/Apple to say your account has been hacked or they detected a virus on your computer, fake "we are refunding your money" or "your account has been auto-debited" scams, fake Google/Alexa listing and work-from-home scams, posing as electric utilities, Verizon, AT&T, or Comcast, fake solar panel and home purchase offers, fake fundraisers asking for donations, fake phone surveys, and the scammers try to steal your credit card, bank account/routing number, Social Security number, and personal information. India scammers often rotate through fake Social Security, subscription auto-renewal, pharmacy, and pre-approved loan scams on the same day. Philippines scammers focus more on auto/home/health/life insurance, Social Security and Medicare identity theft. Scammers use disposable VoIP phone numbers (e.g. MagicJack devices) or they spoof fake names and numbers on Caller ID. Anyone can use telecom software to phone with a fake CID name and number. Scammers spoof thousands of fake 8xx toll-free numbers. CID is useless with scam calls unless the scam asks you to phone them back. CID area codes are never the origin of scam calls since scams use spoofed CID numbers from across the US and Canada, numbers belonging to unsuspecting people, invalid area codes, and fake foreign country CID numbers; e.g. fake women crying "help me" emergency scams often spoof Mexico and Middle East CID numbers. Scammers often spoof the actual phone numbers of businesses such as Apple, Verizon, and banks to trick you into thinking the call is valid. How can you avoid being scammed by phone calls? NEVER trust any unsolicited caller who: sells something (most unsolicited calls are scams so your odds of saving money are very poor); asks for your Social Security number; offers a free gift or reward; threatens you with arrest/lawsuit or says you need to reply back soon (pressure tactic); asks you to access a website, download a file, wire transfer money or buy prepaid debit/gift cards; claims suspicious activity on your account; says your subscription is being refunded or auto-renewed/auto-debited; and all pre-recorded messages. Recordings are far more likely to be malicious scams and not just telemarketer spam. All unsolicited callers with foreign accents, usually Indian or Filipino, are usually scams. Filipino scammers tend to speak better English than Indian scammers. Filipinos speak English with a subtle accent having a slight trill. Scams often say that you inquired about a job, insurance, social security benefits, or that you previously contacted them or visited their website. A common India scam plays a fake Amazon recording. Amazon account updates are emailed, not robo-dialed. Many banks use automated fraud alert calls to confirm a suspicious purchase, but verify the number that the recording tells you to phone or just call the number printed on your credit card. India scammers impersonate AT&T DirecTV, Comcast, or a cable/Internet company, offering fake discounts or service upgrades. Indians impersonate the IRS and Social Security Administration. The IRS/SSA never make unsolicited calls and never threaten to arrest you; they initiate contact via postal mail. Real lawsuits are not phoned in, especially not using pre-recorded threats lacking details; legal notices are mailed/couriered. The police, FBI, DEA never phone to threaten arrest; they show up in person with a warrant. Scammers try to gain your trust by saying your name when they call, but their autodialer automatically displays your name or says your name in a recording when your number is dialed using phone databases that list millions of names and addresses. Scammers often call using an initial recording speaking English, Spanish, or Chinese that is easily generated using text-to-speech translation software to disguise the origin of their India phone room. Some speech synthesis software sound robotic, but others sound natural. To hide their foreign accents, some India scammers use non-Indians in their phone room. Scammers often use interactive voice response (IVR) robotic software that combines voice recognition with artificial intelligence, speaks English with American voices, and responds based on your replies. IVR calls begin with: "Hi, this is fake_name, I am a fake_job_title on a recorded line, can you hear me okay?"; or "Hi, this is fake_name, how are you doing today?"; or "Hello? (pause) Are you there?"; or "Hi, may I speak to your_name?" IVR quickly asks you a short question to elicit a yes/no reply so it hangs up if it encounters voicemail. IVR robots understand basic replies and yes/no answers. To test for IVR, ask "How is the weather over there?" since IVR cannot answer complex questions and it keeps talking if you interrupt it in mid-sentence. IVR usually transfers you to the scammer, but some scams entirely use IVR with the robot asking for your credit card or SSN. A common myth is IVR calls record you saying "yes" so scammers can authorize purchases just using your "yes" voice, but scammers need more than just a recorded "yes" from you - credit cards and SSN. Phone/email scams share two common traits: the CID name/number and the "From:" header on emails are easily faked, and the intent of scam calls is malicious just as file attachments and website links on scam emails are harmful. Scams snowball for many victims. If your personal/financial data are stolen, either by being scammed, visiting a malicious website, or by a previous data breach of a business server that stores your data, then your data gets sold by scammers on the dark web who will see you as fresh meat and prey on you even more. This is why some receive 40+ scam calls everyday while others get 0 to 2 calls per day. If you provide your personal information to a phone scammer, lured by fake 80%-discounted drugs or scared by fake IRS officers, you receive even more phone scams and identity theft can take years to repair. Most unsolicited calls are scams, often with an Indian accent. No other country is infested with pandemics of phone room sweatshops filled with criminals who belong to the lowest India caste and many are thieves and rapists who were serving jail time but released early due to prison overcrowding. Scammers often shout profanities at you. Just laugh at their abusive language. Google "Hindi swear words" and memorize some favorites, e.g. call him "Rundi Ka Bacha" (son of whore) or call her "Rundi Ki Bachi" (daughter of whore). Scammers ignore the National Do-Not-Call Registry; asking scammers to stop calling is useless. You do these scammers a favor by quickly hanging up. But you ruin their scams when you slowly drag them along on the phone call, give them fake personal and credit card data (16 random digits starting with 4 for Visa, 5 for MasterCard), ask them to speak louder and repeat what they said to waste their time and energy.

Laura

November 19, 2021

Credit Card Offer
Caller Name: Citibank

This number is not from Citibank. They are trying to get your information. Fraudulent number.

J

November 19, 2021

Scam
Caller Name: Spoofed Citibank number - phishing

(800) 374-9700 when it rings you is very likely to be a scam call. Do not press one, do NOT engage these people. If you're concerned, call Citibank using the phone number printed on your card. Unfortunately RoboKiller is listing this as a valid number; it *might* be, but it's very likely to be a spoofed number, a scam call to get personal financial information from you. Note especially that the most often quoted amount is $1498. Never engage in a conversation with someone who called YOU and requests financial information, ignore the caller ID match, and ALWAYS CALL THE BANK YOURSELF.

November 19, 2021

block
Scam
Caller Name: Scam

Phishing for Citibank

November 16, 2021

none
Bank

Don’t have an account with this bank

RETUSAF95

November 16, 2021

Bank
Caller Name: (800) 374-9700

I have a app that blocks all numbers that are not on my contact list.

November 15, 2021

Bank
Caller Name: Citibank

Rec'd an automated call to cell phone stating that Citibank was alerting me about suspicious activity in the amount of $1000. I immediately hung up without waiting for the announcement to be completed. Next I checked my online account info which should there were no pending transactions. Using the number on the back of my card, I called Citibank's Fraud Dept and confirmed it was indeed a phishing call which had spoofed an actual Citibank number. Notations were made and the Fraud Dept was happy that I called to report the incident.

November 11, 2021

block
Bank
Caller Name: Hack!!!

I do not have a Citibank card!!

November 11, 2021

none
Bank
Caller Name: Wire transfer

Claims to be from Citibank. RoboKiller blocked the call. Thank you

November 10, 2021

none
Bank

I don’t know anyone at Citibank

November 10, 2021

block
Scam
Caller Name: Citybank Wire Transfer

Said that a transfer of $12998 had been deducted from my account and to press 1 to dispute it.

November 9, 2021

block
Scam
Caller Name: Phishing Fake Citibank

Claims fraudulent activity on account and press 1 to speak with scammer

November 5, 2021

none

most likely a scam

October 29, 2021

block
Scam
Caller Name: Fake Citibank Fraud

Claimed to report fraud, tried to get me give up private info before they gave up. RoboKiller shows this as “BANK”. LOL

October 26, 2021

none
Scam
Caller Name: Scam

Phishing scam

October 26, 2021

block
Bank
Caller Name: Phishing

Scammers

October 25, 2021

block
Credit Card

Multiple calls

October 24, 2021

none

Call. ot answered. Contacted Citibank legit number and was informed no fraudulent charge was made and Citibank did NOT contact me. They recorded all details for their report.

Martin L

October 24, 2021

Scam

I was out today and had a truncated voicemail: “ ... dollar. If you did not authorize this transaction , please press 1 to connect with Citi fraud specialist for dispute . Please press 1 for dispute. “ The caller ID name was Citibankonline and the caller ID phone # was (800)374-9700. I am not worried since I NEVER had a Citibank account or credit card. When I saw that this was listed on the Citibank website as Online Banking Support , it confirmed this was a scam. ALL businesses/agencies reserve phone numbers like Customer Service Representative (CSR) # or any number on your card,business statements or their website for incoming calls you make them. They are NEVER used for outgoing calls by that business ( I once had my bank call me about a suspicious activity . They quoted my full name and partial bank ID and gave a callback #, not the same as the calling # or CSR #). This is definitely a scam. The scammers get this # from the bank website. They falsify the number shown on your phone by a technique called caller ID spoofing. As others have said, it is always best for you to make a call yourself to the CSR #.

October 22, 2021

800-374-4987 is a scam number. Posing as Citi bank, saying there is a suspicious charge on your account... in my case $1889.00. I called Citi Bank security and they do not have thaqt as a valid Citi Bank number.

October 21, 2021

none
Telemarketer
Caller Name: Credit card

You’re right. This is fraud

October 20, 2021

Scam

Psycho Susan E. Magnani sending out robocalls, per usual. She owns Emblazon Industries. She installs spyware onto people's devices, and uploads deep fakes of them too. All to get revenge on customers, employees, or anyone else that doesn't like her. Her only real business is scamming and stalking people out of their time and money. Steer clear of this lying, manipulative individual.

October 20, 2021

none

allow voice mail

October 12, 2021

none
Scam
Caller Name: Not citi bank

Fake Citibank trying to get card information. Sounds real but is not.

October 12, 2021

block
Bank
Caller Name: City Bank Card Scam

Claims a $1498 charge and to press 1 if not a valid charge.

October 12, 2021

block

Caller Issue Unknown, Unrecognized, and as well as UnAuthorized!!!

October 11, 2021

none
Scam

Total scam - bank card.

October 11, 2021

block
Bank
Caller Name: Unauthorized purchase

They try to sound so official. I reported them to the bank.

October 11, 2021

none
Financial Service
Caller Name: CitiBank

Said there was fraud on my card

October 10, 2021

block
Scam

Seeking personal financial information and social security number

October 9, 2021

block

Scam

October 6, 2021

none

might be a scammer according to the bank

October 4, 2021

block
Bank
Caller Name: Citibank

Fraudulent

October 3, 2021

block
Bank
Caller Name: Scam

Trying to get if get information

Elle

October 3, 2021

Bank
Caller Name: Citibank (Spammer)

Charges of $1498 made on my card? I don't have a card.

October 2, 2021

none
Credit Card
Caller Name: Spoofing Citibank, potential credit card fraud.

I don’t have a Citibank card, but caller is claiming a $468 charge is about to be made.

October 2, 2021

none

Hey, go f**k yourself spammer!

October 1, 2021

Bank
Caller Name: Citibank Fraud

I have been receiving many calls from this number. Today, I have received 24 calls at the same time continuously. It said, Citibank so I started to concerned but I realized this is spam.

October 1, 2021

none
Bank
Caller Name: Citibank Suspicious activity scam

We don’t have Citibank Card

Deephouse

September 30, 2021

This is a fraud, almost fooled me. Crook was slick wanting me to open a chrome browser and start a remote session. That's when i realized this is a scam.

September 30, 2021

Bank

How did Citi Bank SPAM get my phone number???????

Jason

September 28, 2021

Scam
Caller Name: CitiBank

I do not have a Citi account so I did not worry about this phishing call/voicemail they left. What is concerning is, when I went to go report this number, it is the same number listed on the Citibank as their costumer service line. This can trick hundreds of innocent people. I called my local Citibank and they confirmed I am not the only one who got a usual call like this. Stay safe and always call you bank and find out for yourself. Do no give out information. Call your local Citibank, even if you are not an account holder and report.

September 28, 2021

Bank
Caller Name: Citi-Bank Fake

Same message as above. Don't have a card!

September 19, 2021

Caller Name: scam

received call Thursday 1228h PDST with recorded message claiming there had been $xxx charge to our account – FAKE

September 16, 2021

Scam

Like several others said there was a charge of $1498 on my Citibank card. I don’t even have a Citibank account anymore so I just notified Citibank through their email about it b

September 13, 2021

Financial Service

This is a scam—spoke to Citibank and reported them. BLOCK this number! They literally used the $1,498 figure in my recording. They will come up at "Citibank Atm" on your caller ID.

September 7, 2021

Scam
Caller Name: Cheryl Van Gundy

Cheryl Van Gundy is SCAMMER

July 12, 2021

Bank

My wife picked up the phone, said Citibank is notifying us of a charge. we are Citi customers. Told her to hang up as I programmed our Citi accounts to text and email me of all transactions. Real Citi notification goes to our mobile phone# and email address only. This scam call is the second such call in recent weeks from this number.

June 14, 2021

I called the number since it as listed as Citibank customre service. Looking back after I hung up my phone listed it as 800 371 9700. When I called 800 374 9700 Recording sai press 1 if over age 50 or 2 if under. I pressed 1 and got a VERY aggressive sales agent wanting my personal data for my FREE Medial Alert Device. I attempted to cut in to sy I wanted to speak to a Citibank agent about BANKING. Finally "Medical agent" said I could not be transferred and hung up. Called a different Citibank # and offered FREE Road Service blah blah blah. Again no access to banking agent. While I dialed the number listed on Google (800 374 9700) twice my phone was switched to 800 371 9700. Something fishy. Medical device saleswoman was aggressive to the point of being obnoxious, rude and condescending. Not an effective sales technique in my experience.

SCAM

June 9, 2021

Scam
Caller Name: Spoofed Citibank Number

Number was Citibank online phone number but was a spoofed number. I do not have a Citibank account. Call was checking on purchase. I did not answer the phone. I called Citibank and they said they were getting a lot of calls about this scam. Citibank did not call me.

Sl

June 7, 2021

Bank

I DO NOT have any business dealings with Citibank. So I know this is a scam. Why don't you get a real job.

Thump

May 11, 2021

Scam
Caller Name: Pretending to be citibank

This is a phishing scam and they are doing everything they can to mask that they are trying to get your information by pretending to be an actual bank up to and including changing their caller ID to show as the bank's name. They have even gone as far as setting up a phony website. I answered the call and then called my bank and they verified that this is not one of their phone numbers and is a fraudulent phishing call. They also verify there were no erroneous charges on my account . Do not pay attention to this phone number do not give them any information. Always call the actual bank of an unsolicited phone call. Never answer a call that you've received directly. Always take the extra step and go around the back door to verify your account. Robokiller needs to update their information to show this phone number as being a scam.

Martin L

April 30, 2021

Scam

Yesterday at 1:59PM ET, I got this voicemail : “ ... dollar. If you did not authorize this transaction , please press 1 to connect with Citi fraud specialist for dispute . Please press 1 for dispute. “ I wasn’t worried. I do not have a Citibank account or credit card. This is Citibank’s custom representative # which they would not use to call a customer. So this is a scammer spoofing Citibank’s CSR #. Ignore the call or call Citibank’s number yourself directly.

April 27, 2021

Foreign Language

Fake credit card or account fraud notification scam by madarchod criminals phoning from India and spoofing the actual Citibank phone number on Caller ID. This number does belong to Citibank, but it is being spoofed as a fake number on Caller ID for a fake credit card or account security and fraud alert scam by criminals calling from India to steal your credit card and Social Security numbers, bank account user login and password, and other personal and financial information. The scam may begin with a pre-recorded robotic message speaking English that is generated using text-to-speech translation software to disguise the origin of this India scam, but then you talk to the India scammer. The recording tells you that their fraud services department detected suspicious activity on your credit card or your bank account. This scam bait message is designed to scare you and the India scammer then asks for your credit card number, PIN codes, online login passwords, answers to security questions, Social Security number, and other personal information "for verification purposes". Whenever you receive a fraud alert call from a bank, credit card issuer, Amazon, Apple, UPS/FedEx/DHL, or any business, ALWAYS verify the number that they ask you to call back on, or just phone the number that is printed on the back of your credit card or the number listed on the company website. About 70% of North America scam calls come from India and 25% come from the Philippines. India scammers run hundreds of fraud, extortion, and money laundering scams every day such as posing as a fake pharmacy, fake Social Security officer saying your benefits are suspended, IRS officer collecting on fake unpaid back taxes, debt collector threatening you for fake unpaid bills, fake bank/financial/FedEx/UPS/DHL scams, pretending to offer fake health insurance, car warranty, student loan forgiveness, credit card and debt consolidation services, posing as Amazon to falsely say an unauthorized purchase was made to your credit card or your Prime membership was auto-debited from your bank, posing as Microsoft/Dell/HP/Apple to say your account has been hacked or they detected a virus on your computer, fake "we are refunding your money" or "your account has been auto-debited" scams, fake Google/Alexa listing and work-from-home scams, posing as electric utilities, Verizon, AT&T, or Comcast, fake solar panel and home purchase offers, fake fundraisers asking for donations, fake phone surveys, and the scammers try to steal your credit card, bank account/routing number, Social Security number, and personal information. A India call center may rotate through a fake Social Security, subscription auto-renewal, pharmacy, and credit card offer scam within one week. Philippines scammers focus more on auto/home/health/life insurance, Social Security and Medicare identity theft. Scammers use disposable VoIP phone numbers (e.g. MagicJack devices) or they spoof fake names and numbers on Caller ID. Anyone can use telecom software to phone with a fake CID name and number. Scammers spoof thousands of fake 8xx toll-free numbers. CID is useless with scam calls unless the scam asks you to phone them back. CID area codes are never the origin of scam calls since scams use spoofed CID numbers from across the US and Canada, numbers belonging to unsuspecting people, invalid area codes, and fake foreign country CID numbers; e.g. fake women crying "help me" emergency scams often spoof Mexico and Middle East CID numbers. Scammers often spoof the actual phone numbers of businesses such as Apple, Verizon, and banks to trick you into thinking the call is valid. How can you avoid being scammed by phone calls? NEVER trust any unsolicited caller who: sells something (most unsolicited calls are scams so your odds of saving money are very poor); asks for your Social Security number; offers a free gift or reward; threatens you with arrest/lawsuit or says you need to reply back soon (pressure tactic); asks you to access a website, download a file, wire transfer money or buy prepaid debit/gift cards; claims suspicious activity on your account; says your subscription is being refunded or auto-renewed/auto-debited; and all pre-recorded messages. Recordings are far more likely to be malicious scams and not just telemarketer spam. All unsolicited callers with foreign accents, usually Indian or Filipino, are mostly scams. Filipino scammers tend to speak better English than Indian scammers. Filipinos speak English with a subtle accent having a slight trill. Scams often say that you inquired about a job, insurance, social security benefits, or that you previously contacted them or visited their website. A common India phone scam uses a fake Amazon recording about a purchase of an iPhone, but Amazon never robo-dials and Amazon account updates are emailed. Many banks use automated fraud alert calls to confirm a suspicious purchase, but always verify the number that the recording tells you to phone or just call the number printed on your credit card. Some scams ask for your credit card for purchase of their fake product or service. The scammer calls you back one day later to say their credit card machine is broken, so you must wire transfer the payment to them. After you have wired the money to them, they still overcharge your credit card after they change phone numbers, so they rob you twice before disappearing. Wire transfers and prepaid debit cards laundered through foreign bank accounts are untraceable. Scammers try to gain your trust by saying your name when they call, but their autodialer automatically displays your name or says your name in a recording when your number is dialed using phone databases that list millions of names and addresses. Scammers often call using an initial recording speaking English, Spanish, or Chinese that is easily generated using text-to-speech translation software to disguise the origin of their India phone room. Some speech synthesis software sound robotic, but others sound natural. To hide their foreign accents, some India scammers use non-Indians in their phone room. Scammers often use interactive voice response (IVR) robotic software that combines voice recognition with artificial intelligence, speaks English with American voices, and responds based on your replies. IVR calls begin with: "Hi, this is fake_name, I am a fake_job_title on a recorded line, can you hear me okay?"; or "Hi, this is fake_name, how are you doing today?"; or "Hello? (pause) Are you there?"; or "Hi, may I speak to your_name?" IVR quickly asks you a short question to elicit a yes/no reply so it hangs up if it encounters voicemail. IVR robots understand basic replies and yes/no answers. To test for IVR, ask "How is the weather over there?" since IVR cannot answer complex questions and it keeps talking if you interrupt it in mid-sentence. IVR usually transfers you to the scammer, but some scams entirely use IVR with the robot asking for your credit card or SSN. A common myth is IVR calls record you saying "yes" so scammers can authorize purchases just using your "yes" voice, but scammers need more than just a recorded "yes" from you - credit cards and SSN. Phone/email scams share two common traits: the CID name/number and the "From:" header on emails are easily faked, and the intent of scam calls is malicious just as file attachments and website links on scam emails are harmful. Scams snowball for many victims. If your personal/financial data are stolen, either by being scammed, visiting a malicious website, or by a previous data breach of a business server that stores your data, then your data gets sold by scammers on the dark web who will see you as fresh meat and prey on you even more. This is why some receive 40+ scam calls everyday while others get 0 to 2 calls per day. If you provide your personal information to a phone scammer, lured by fake 80%-discounted drugs or scared by fake IRS officers, you receive even more phone scams and identity theft can take years to repair. Most unsolicited calls are scams, often with an Indian accent. No other country is infested with pandemics of phone room sweatshops filled with criminals who belong to the lowest India caste and many are thieves and rapists who were serving jail time but released early due to prison overcrowding. Scammers often shout profanities at you. Just laugh at their abusive language. Google "Hindi swear words" and memorize some favorites, e.g. call him "Rundi Ka Bacha" (son of whore) or call her "Rundi Ki Bachi" (daughter of whore). Scammers ignore the National Do-Not-Call Registry; asking scammers to stop calling is useless. You do these scammers a favor by quickly hanging up. But you ruin their scams when you slowly drag them along on the phone call, give them fake personal and credit card data (16 random digits starting with 4 for Visa, 5 for MasterCard), ask them to speak louder and repeat what they said to waste their time and energy.

February 13, 2021

Scam
Caller Name: CALLER ID (800) 374-9700

Message left: "Do you know someone is trying to use your credit card online?" I called the number and the bank did not recognize my card number or social # My conclusion it was a phishing attempt

Alice

July 27, 2020

Bank
Caller Name: Citi Bank?

Voice mail sounded legit... Something to do with a verification number for an online transaction. I've had my phone number for less than a month.

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