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(210) 520-0457 is a Bank Call

Alternately: +12105200457

Reported Name:

Chase Bank

Reported Category:

Bank

User Reputation

Negative

RoboKiller Block Status

Blocked

Last Call

October 17, 2021

Total Calls

337,309

Based On

1,906 user reports

Listen

Transcription

this is an important message from Chase please return our call today at █████ your business is important to us thank you for choosing Chase

The information on this site is based on available user feedback.

What is this scam? How do I determine if this is a scam?

Victims of bank scams receive a phone call that looks like a real phone number at which the person has an account. The person or recording provides claims you’re the victim of fraud and that they need to provide details, often including their account PIN, to set up a replacement card or freeze an account. Scammers then use that information to manufacture ATM or debit cards, and make withdrawals or purchases. Or they can use online banking to transfer money or issue checks. Some scams simply collect information and then sell it to third parties.

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46 user reports for (210) 520-0457

The comments below are user submitted reports by third parties and are not endorsed by RoboKiller.

October 19, 2021

Scam

Psycho Susan E. Magnani sending out robocalls, per usual. She owns Emblazon Industries. She installs spyware onto people's devices, and uploads deep fakes of them too. All to get revenge on customers, employees, or anyone else that doesn't like her. Her only real business is scamming and stalking people out of their time and money. Steer clear of this lying, manipulative individual.

October 19, 2021

block

Too many unwanted calls

September 9, 2021

none

PHISHING SCAM!! I called the actual Chase bank customer service number and they confirmed they didn’t call. If you call the number back it immediately asks for your account number. Chase customer service stated they wouldn’t call customers directly unless requested.

August 3, 2021

block
Caller Name: Spam

Spam

July 28, 2021

block

Personal

July 22, 2021

Foreign Language

Fake Chase Bank impersonation phantom debt collection scam by madarchod criminals phoning from India This is what the Federal Trade Commission calls a phantom debt collection scam where the scammer pretends to be a debt collector, bank or credit agency, billing department, lawyer, or law enforcement and threatens to sue or arrest you using lies, harassment, and intimidation to collect on fake debts that you do not owe. Debt collection scams are very common because many people carry debts, so it is easier for scammers to phish for gullible victims. And Indian debt collection scams have vastly increased this year to prey upon the larger number of people in debt. Hundreds of 210, 614, 813 area code numbers, along with 866-351-0119, 866-892-7180, 833-620-2698, and numerous other numbers are being used by the same scammers to spoof a fake "JPMorgan Chase" name on Caller ID. Many of the various scam numbers play a recording that tells you to phone the scammers back at 866-351-0119 or 866-892-7180. If you receive an unsolicited call from a bank, never give them your SSN or credit card number! And ALWAYS phone a bank using a number printed on the back of the credit card or listed on their website; never phone the number that a phone message tells you to call unless you want to toy with the scammers. The India scammer asks for you by your name in order to sound like a personal phone call to gain your trust, but they are randomly auto-dialing everyone. The scammer may say "I am calling on a recorded line" just to sound official, but it is fake! The scammer either mentions an unpaid debt and past due amount that must be paid immediately or says that they have frozen your Chase account due to fraudulent activity. The scammer then asks for your online banking login credentials, Social Security number and date of birth "for verification purposes", and says you can settle the debt by paying with a credit card, prepaid debit card, or eBay gift card, or demands that you wire transfer the payment, or asks for your bank account/routing number. About 65% of North America scam calls come from India and 30% come from the Philippines. India scammers run hundreds of fraud, extortion, and money laundering scams every day such as posing as a fake pharmacy, fake Social Security officer saying your benefits are suspended, IRS officer collecting on fake unpaid back taxes, debt collector threatening you for fake unpaid bills, fake bank/financial/FedEx/UPS/DHL scams, pretending to offer fake health insurance, car warranty, student loan forgiveness, credit card and debt consolidation services, posing as Amazon to falsely say an unauthorized purchase was made to your credit card or your Prime membership was auto-debited from your bank, posing as Microsoft/Dell/HP/Apple to say your account has been hacked or they detected a virus on your computer, fake "we are refunding your money" or "your account has been auto-debited" scams, fake Google/Alexa listing and work-from-home scams, posing as electric utilities, Verizon, AT&T, or Comcast, fake solar panel and home purchase offers, fake fundraisers asking for donations, fake phone surveys, and the scammers try to steal your credit card, bank account/routing number, Social Security number, and personal information. India scammers often rotate through fake Social Security, subscription auto-renewal, pharmacy, and pre-approved loan scams on the same day. Philippines scammers focus more on auto/home/health/life insurance, Social Security and Medicare identity theft. Scammers use disposable VoIP phone numbers (e.g. MagicJack devices) or they spoof fake names and numbers on Caller ID. Anyone can use telecom software to phone with a fake CID name and number. Scammers spoof thousands of fake 8xx toll-free numbers. CID is useless with scam calls unless the scam asks you to phone them back. CID area codes are never the origin of scam calls since scams use spoofed CID numbers from across the US and Canada, numbers belonging to unsuspecting people, invalid area codes, and fake foreign country CID numbers; e.g. fake women crying "help me" emergency scams often spoof Mexico and Middle East CID numbers. Scammers often spoof the actual phone numbers of businesses such as Apple, Verizon, and banks to trick you into thinking the call is valid. How can you avoid being scammed by phone calls? NEVER trust any unsolicited caller who: sells something (most unsolicited calls are scams so your odds of saving money are very poor); asks for your Social Security number; offers a free gift or reward; threatens you with arrest/lawsuit or says you need to reply back soon (pressure tactic); asks you to access a website, download a file, wire transfer money or buy prepaid debit/gift cards; claims suspicious activity on your account; says your subscription is being refunded or auto-renewed/auto-debited; and all pre-recorded messages. Recordings are far more likely to be malicious scams and not just telemarketer spam. All unsolicited callers with foreign accents, usually Indian or Filipino, are usually scams. Filipino scammers tend to speak better English than Indian scammers. Filipinos speak English with a subtle accent having a slight trill. Scams often say that you inquired about a job, insurance, social security benefits, or that you previously contacted them or visited their website. A common India scam plays a fake Amazon recording. Amazon account updates are emailed, not robo-dialed. Many banks use automated fraud alert calls to confirm a suspicious purchase, but verify the number that the recording tells you to phone or just call the number printed on your credit card. India scammers impersonate AT&T DirecTV, Comcast, or a cable/Internet company, offering fake discounts or service upgrades. Indians impersonate the IRS and Social Security Administration. The IRS/SSA never make unsolicited calls and never threaten to arrest you; they initiate contact via postal mail. Real lawsuits are not phoned in, especially not using vague threats lacking details; legal notices are mailed/couriered. The police, FBI, DEA never phone to threaten arrest; they show up in person with a warrant. Scammers try to gain your trust by saying your name when they call, but their autodialer automatically displays your name or says your name in a recording when your number is dialed using phone databases that list millions of names and addresses. Scammers often call using an initial recording speaking English, Spanish, or Chinese that is easily generated using text-to-speech translation software to disguise the origin of their India phone room. Some speech synthesis software sound robotic, but others sound natural. To hide their foreign accents, some India scammers use non-Indians in their phone room. Scammers often use interactive voice response (IVR) robotic software that combines voice recognition with artificial intelligence, speaks English with American voices, and responds based on your replies. IVR calls begin with: "Hi, this is fake_name, I am a fake_job_title on a recorded line, can you hear me okay?"; or "Hi, this is fake_name, how are you doing today?"; or "Hello? (pause) Are you there?"; or "Hi, may I speak to your_name?" IVR quickly asks you a short question to elicit a yes/no reply so it hangs up if it encounters voicemail. IVR robots understand basic replies and yes/no answers. To test for IVR, ask "How is the weather over there?" since IVR cannot answer complex questions and it keeps talking if you interrupt it in mid-sentence. IVR usually transfers you to the scammer, but some scams entirely use IVR with the robot asking for your credit card or SSN. A common myth is IVR calls record you saying "yes" so scammers can authorize purchases just using your "yes" voice, but scammers need more than just a recorded "yes" from you - credit cards and SSN. Phone/email scams share two common traits: the CID name/number and the "From:" header on emails are easily faked, and the intent of scam calls is malicious just as file attachments and website links on scam emails are harmful. Scams snowball for many victims. If your personal/financial data are stolen, either by being scammed, visiting a malicious website, or by a previous data breach of a business server that stores your data, then your data gets sold by scammers on the dark web who will see you as fresh meat and prey on you even more. This is why some receive 40+ scam calls everyday while others get 0 to 2 calls per day. If you provide your personal information to a phone scammer, lured by fake 80%-discounted drugs or scared by fake IRS officers, you receive even more phone scams and identity theft can take years to repair. Most unsolicited calls are scams, often with an Indian accent. No other country is infested with pandemics of phone room sweatshops filled with criminals who belong to the lowest India caste and many are thieves and rapists who were serving jail time but released early due to prison overcrowding. Scammers often shout profanities at you. Just laugh at their abusive language. Google "Hindi swear words" and memorize some favorites, e.g. call him "Rundi Ka Bacha" (son of whore) or call her "Rundi Ki Bachi" (daughter of whore). Scammers ignore the National Do-Not-Call Registry; asking scammers to stop calling is useless. You do these scammers a favor by quickly hanging up. But you ruin their scams when you slowly drag them along on the phone call, give them fake personal and credit card data (16 random digits starting with 4 for Visa, 5 for MasterCard), ask them to speak louder and repeat what they said to waste their time and energy.

June 16, 2021

none
Financial Service

I don’t know this number.

February 16, 2021

none
Bank
Caller Name: Scam

from my knowledge Chase Bank doesn’t call customers

February 15, 2021

Scam
Caller Name: Fake bank impersonation scam

India crime cartel pretends to be Chase Bank!

February 5, 2021

block
Scam
Caller Name: Spam

Why people call my phone

ruffienne2017

December 29, 2020

Scam

This was a prank robocall sent by ex friend, Susan M. Be careful who you give your information to in this world.

December 23, 2020

Scam
Caller Name: THIS IS NOT CHASE BANK! THIS IS A SCAM!

This is yet another phone room in India crowded with greasy monkey humpers who are all trying extra hard this month to RIP YOU OFF so these crooks can buy their own Christmas gifts using YOUR STOLEN MONEY and YOUR STOLEN IDENTITY. Be smart! Nearly all unsolicited phone calls are scams, especially this year and this month!!!!

December 19, 2020

block
Scam
Caller Name: Scam thief

Continue blocking

October 4, 2020

block
Scam
Caller Name: Chase bank

I don’t bank with them

October 3, 2020

Scam
Caller Name: More Indian douchebugs pretending to be banks

Don't fall for this scam! These d-bags from India frequently pretend to be Chase, Bank of America, Wells Fargo, etc.

October 2, 2020

block

Na

October 1, 2020

block
Bank

I don’t have no account at chase bank

September 30, 2020

block
Bank
Caller Name: Banki representative

Banks don't make the kind of calls such as this one. If a bank representative calls ANYONE, DON'T speak with them, nor take a number from them to call back on; THAT'S A SCAM! Instead, say, 'i'll ring YOU back at the number I have in my records'

September 30, 2020

block
Bank
Caller Name: Reduce interest

Scam

September 29, 2020

block
Bank
Caller Name: I have no accounts with chase!

Wanted my credit card so they can verify my credentials

September 29, 2020

Scam
Caller Name: Caller ID says "Chase" but it's fake.

Indian bullshyt basturd pretended to be Chase Bank.

September 26, 2020

none
Scam

Wanted my personal information last month and I never give that out over the phone. I called my local bank and they said to ignore the call.

September 25, 2020

block
Announcement
Caller Name: Crap

Block ❣️⭐️

September 24, 2020

Scam
Caller Name: It says Chase on Caller Id, but it is a scam!

Yet another smelly Indian cockroach breathing heavily into the phone, and hopefully spreading coronavirus to his entire phone room!

steve

September 23, 2020

Scam
Caller Name: india goat herder spoofing chase on caller id

scumbag india goat herder stealing your money

September 23, 2020

Scam
Caller Name: Indians pretending to be Chase

Caller probably did not realize his speaker was left on while he conversed with others in a noisy boiler room, speaking what sounded like Hindi, before he finally spoke to me a minute later. Spoke with a thick accent, could barely understand him. But I did understand when he asked for my social number, and that is when I hung up. These India scammers are relentless! I read a few days ago that India is now the new COVID-19 epicenter for Coronavirus infections, so their imploding economy is triggering huge tsunamis of phone scammers working in germy phone rooms trying to steal your money! That explains why I am noticing far more Indians phoning me with every kind of scam right now! Every week, they pretend to be just about everyone except my father lol. And these callers are all ready to drop the f-bomb if you politely tell them to stop calling!

August 19, 2020

Scam
Caller Name: fake Chase scam

Chase impersonator with foreign accent. Anyone who speaks English this bad was obviously not hired by Chase lol

August 15, 2020

allow
Bank
Caller Name: Chase card services

Chase card services

August 12, 2020

Scam

Fake Chase phantom debt collection scam by madarchod criminals phoning from India This is what the Federal Trade Commission calls a phantom debt collection scam where the scammer pretends to be a debt collector, bank or credit agency, billing department, lawyer, or law enforcement and threatens to sue or arrest you using lies, harassment, and intimidation to collect on fake debts that you do not owe. Debt collection scams are very common because many people carry debts, so it is easier for scammers to phish for gullible victims. And Indian debt collection scams have vastly increased this year to prey upon the larger number of people in debt. This 210-520-0457, 210-520-1454, 614-890-1025, 866-351-0119, and numerous other numbers are being used by the same scammers to spoof a fake "JPMorgan Chase" name on Caller ID. Many of the various scam numbers play a recording that tells you to phone the scammers back at 866-351-0119. If you receive an solicited call from a bank, never give them your SSN or credit card number! And ALWAYS phone a bank using a number printed on the back of the credit card or listed on their website; never phone the number the message tells you to call unless you want to toy with them. The India scammer asks for you by your name in order to sound like a personal phone call to gain your trust, but they are randomly auto-dialing everyone. The scammer may say "I am calling on a recorded line" just to sound official, but it is fake! The scammer either mentions an unpaid debt and past due amount that must be paid immediately or says that they have frozen your Chase account due to fraudulent activity. The scammer then asks for your online banking login credentials, Social Security number and date of birth "for verification purposes", and either tells you that you can settle the debt by paying with a credit card or demands that you wire transfer the payment for the fake debt or asks for your bank account/routing number. More than 95% of North America phone scams come from India scammers who operate hundreds of fraud, extortion, and money laundering scams every day such as posing as a fake pharmacy; fake Social Security officer saying your benefits are suspended; IRS officer collecting on fake unpaid back taxes; debt collector threatening you for fake unpaid bills; fake bank, financial, Fedex/UPS/DHL scams; pretending to offer fake health insurance, car warranty, student loan forgiveness, credit card and debt consolidation services; posing as Amazon to falsely say an unauthorized purchase was made to your credit card or your Prime membership was auto-debited from your bank; posing as Microsoft/Dell/HP/Apple to say your account has been hacked or they detected a virus on your computer; fake "we are refunding your money" or "your account has been auto-debited" scams; fake Google/Alexa listing and work-from-home scams; posing as an electric utility or Verizon-AT&T-Comcast to say your service is suspended; fake solar panel and home purchase offers; fake fundraisers asking for donations; fake phone surveys; and the scammers try to steal your credit card, bank account/routing number, Social Security number, and personal information. A India call center may rotate through a fake Social Security, computer subscription auto-renewal, pharmacy, and credit card offer scam during one week. Scammers use disposable VoIP phone numbers (e.g. MagicJack devices) or they spoof fake names and numbers on Caller ID. Anyone can use telecom software or a third-party service to phone with a fake CID that displays a fake name and number. India scammers spoof thousands of fake 8xx toll-free numbers. The CID is useless with scam calls unless the scam asks you to phone them back and CID area codes are almost never the origin of scam calls. You waste your time researching CID since scams use spoofed CID numbers from across the US and Canada, numbers belonging to unsuspecting people, invalid area codes, and also fake foreign country CID numbers; e.g. fake women crying "help me" emergency scams from India spoof Mexico and Middle East CID numbers. India scammers also spoof the actual phone numbers of businesses such as Apple, Verizon, and banks to trick you into thinking the call is valid. How can you avoid being scammed by phone calls? NEVER trust any unsolicited caller who sells something (most unsolicited calls are scams so your odds of saving money are very poor); asks for your Social Security number; offers a free gift or reward; threatens you with arrest/lawsuit or says you need to reply back soon (pressure tactic); asks you to access a website, download a file, wire transfer money or buy gift cards; claims suspicious activity on your account; says your subscription is being refunded or auto-renewed/auto-debited; and all pre-recorded messages. Recordings are far more likely to be malicious scams and not just telemarketer spam. All unsolicited callers with foreign accents, usually Indian, should immediately be suspected as scams. Many scams falsely say that you inquired about a job, insurance, social security benefits, or that you previously contacted them or visited their website. A common India phone scam uses a fake Amazon recording about a purchase of an iPhone, but Amazon never robo-dials and Amazon account updates are notified in emails. Many banks use automated fraud alert phone calls to confirm a suspicious purchase, but always verify the number that the recording tells you to phone or just call the number printed on your credit card. A common India scam tactic asks for your credit card for purchase of their fake product or service. The scammer calls you back one day later to say their credit card machine is broken, so you must wire transfer the payment to them. After you have wired the money to them, they still overcharge your credit card after they change phone numbers, so they rob you twice before disappearing. Wire transfers laundered through foreign bank accounts are untraceable. Scammers try to gain your trust by saying your name when they call, but their autodialer automatically displays your name or says your name in a recording when your number is dialed using phone databases that list millions of names and addresses. Scammers often call using an initial recording speaking English, Spanish, or Chinese that is easily generated using text-to-speech translation software to disguise the origin of their India phone room. Some speech synthesis software sound robotic, but others sound natural. To hide their foreign accents, some India scammers use non-Indians in their phone room. India scammers often use interactive voice response (IVR) robotic software that combines voice recognition with artificial intelligence, speaks English with American voices, and responds based on your replies. IVR calls begin with: "Hi, this is fake_name, I am a fake_job_title on a recorded line, can you hear me okay?"; or "Hi, this is fake_name, how are you doing today?"; or "Hello? (pause) Are you there?"; or "Hi, may I speak to your_name?" IVR quickly asks you a short question to elicit a yes/no reply so it hangs up if it encounters voicemail. IVR robots understand basic replies and yes/no answers. To test for IVR, ask "How is the weather over there?" since IVR cannot answer complex questions and it keeps talking if you interrupt it in mid-sentence. IVR usually transfers you to the scammer, but some scams entirely use IVR with the robot asking for your credit card or SSN. A common myth is that IVR calls record you saying "yes" so scammers can authorize purchases just using your "yes" voice, but scammers need more than just a recorded "yes" from you - credit cards and SSN. Phone/email scams share two common traits: the CID name/number and the "From:" header on emails are easily faked, and the intent of scam calls is malicious just as file attachments and website links on scam emails are harmful. Scams snowball for many victims. If your personal/financial data are stolen, either by being scammed, visiting a malicious website, or by a previous data breach of a business server that stores your data, then your data gets sold by scammers on the dark web who will see you as fresh meat and prey on you even more. This is why some receive 40+ scam calls everyday while others get 0 to 2 calls per day. If you provide your personal and financial data to a phone scammer, lured by fake 80%-discounted drugs or scared by fake IRS officers, you receive far more phone scams and identity theft can take years to repair. Most unsolicited calls are scams, often with an Indian accent. No other country is infested with pandemics of phone room sweatshops filled with criminals who belong to the lowest India caste and many are thieves and rapists who were serving jail time but released early due to prison overcrowding. India scammers shout profanities at you. Just laugh at their abusive language. Google "Hindi swear words" and memorize some favorites, e.g. call him "Rundi Ka Bacha" (son of whore) or call her "Rundi Ki Bachi" (daughter of whore). Scammers ignore the National Do-Not-Call Registry; asking scammers to stop calling is useless. You do these scammers a favor by quickly hanging up. But you ruin their scams when you slowly drag them along on the phone call, always give them fake personal and credit card data (16 random digits starting with 4 for Visa, 5 for MasterCard), ask them to speak louder and repeat what they said to waste their time and energy.

July 19, 2020

none
Caller Name: Amazing

Wanted debt

July 3, 2020

none

If I have this call blocked why is it still coming through

June 1, 2020

none
Bank
Caller Name: Chase

Call non stop. This is my 5th call today

April 4, 2020

none

An

February 10, 2020

allow

I need this call. Don’t block.

February 10, 2020

allow

This is not a scam.

February 2, 2020

allow

Car Loan Bank

July 14, 2019

allow

This is my bank

July 5, 2019

allow

It’s my dam bank 😩

July 4, 2019

allow

My bank

May 17, 2019

block
Bank

Don’t call me

May 14, 2019

block
Bill Reminder

Chase Bank

May 14, 2019

allow

Chase bank

April 7, 2019

block
Bank

Chase Bank

April 3, 2019

block
Scam

Pretending to be Chase Bank

January 22, 2019

block

uncertain based off of nothingness

December 18, 2018

allow

Chase Bank

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